1981
DOI: 10.1001/archderm.117.10.674
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Granulomatous perivasculitis in Crohn's disease

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Cited by 23 publications
(19 citation statements)
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“…Skin manifestations occur in about 15% of patients with inflammatory bowel disorders [4] . Most frequently accompanying skin manifestations are pyoderma gangrenosum and erythema nodosum, while necrotizing vasculitis, cutaneous polyarteritis nodosa and granulomatous perivasculitis are less frequently seen [5][6][7][8] . Although the etiopathogenesis of extra-intestinal manifestations is not clear, a partial defect of immunity common to the skin and intestines has been suggested [5] .…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Skin manifestations occur in about 15% of patients with inflammatory bowel disorders [4] . Most frequently accompanying skin manifestations are pyoderma gangrenosum and erythema nodosum, while necrotizing vasculitis, cutaneous polyarteritis nodosa and granulomatous perivasculitis are less frequently seen [5][6][7][8] . Although the etiopathogenesis of extra-intestinal manifestations is not clear, a partial defect of immunity common to the skin and intestines has been suggested [5] .…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…However, two predominant theories have been suggested [12, 24]. One theory relies on the notion that the lesions are due to a granulomatous response involving perivascular localization of monocytes and epithelioid histiocytes to unknown antigens from the gastrointestinal tract carried through the circulatory system and eventually deposited within the skin [10, 25, 26]. The second theory suggests a granulomatous vasculitis picture secondary to a type IV hypersensitivity reaction in which sensitized T lymphocytes react to circulating antigens releasing various lymphokines and activating monocytes resulting in granulomatous damage of the vessel wall and inflammation [10, 2628].…”
Section: Pathogenesismentioning
confidence: 99%
“…These include an inflammatory infiltrate commonly consisting of sterile noncaseating sarcoid-type granulomas, foreign body and Langhans giant cells, epithelioid histiocytes, and plasma cells surrounded by numerous lymphomononuclear cells found within the dermis and occasionally extending into the subcutis [810, 12, 20, 26]. Some of these granulomas are arranged perivascularly with normal vessel walls [12, 28, 3133], whereas others exhibit a perivasculitic pattern, as they are associated with small- and medium-vessel vasculitis [12, 20, 21, 25, 27, 28, 34, 35]. The perivascular arrangement is attributed to the theory that MCD is the result of either deposition of immune complexes or circulating antigens within the skin [7, 28].…”
Section: Histologymentioning
confidence: 99%
“…In addition, cutaneous necrotizing vasculitis has been described in association with idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease. It has been reported in occasional patients with ulcerative colitis (Callen 1979) and to date in a total of 8 patients with Crohn's disease (Dyer et al 1970), Verbov & Stansfield 1972, Burgdorf& Orkin 1981, Chalvardjian & Nethercott 1982. In a series including 6 of these patients, the vascular changes were interpreted as representing coexistent cutaneous polyarteritis nodosa (Dyer et al 1970, Verbov & Stansfield 1972.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 95%
“…It is of interest that in one case the inflammation was described as granulomatous. The remaining 2 of the 8 patients showed cutaneous granulomatous vasculitis and this was considered to be a manifestation of Crohn's disease (Burgdorf & Orkin 1981, Chalvardjian & Nethercott 1982. In both of these cases the diagnosis of Crohn's disease had been established 14 years previously.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 98%