2016
DOI: 10.1016/s0140-6736(16)31679-8
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Abstract: SummaryBackgroundThe Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study 2015 provides an up-to-date synthesis of the evidence for risk factor exposure and the attributable burden of disease. By providing national and subnational assessments spanning the past 25 years, this study can inform debates on the importance of addressing risks in context.MethodsWe used the comparative risk assessment framework developed for previous iterations of the Global Burden of Disease Study to estimate attributable deat… Show more

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Cited by 4,272 publications
(2,043 citation statements)
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References 116 publications
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“…Some studies in Ghana have alluded to the fact that socioculturally, a large body size among females is perceived as a sign of affluence [27], and women with higher education are likely to be affluent and have more exposure to energy-dense foods. The observed association of sedentary lifestyle with higher BMI among men and women is largely consistent with other studies both outside [1] and within Africa [39,45] and Ghana [41,42]. …”
Section: Discussionsupporting
confidence: 90%
See 3 more Smart Citations
“…Some studies in Ghana have alluded to the fact that socioculturally, a large body size among females is perceived as a sign of affluence [27], and women with higher education are likely to be affluent and have more exposure to energy-dense foods. The observed association of sedentary lifestyle with higher BMI among men and women is largely consistent with other studies both outside [1] and within Africa [39,45] and Ghana [41,42]. …”
Section: Discussionsupporting
confidence: 90%
“…Cardiometabolic diseases have become a major global health concern and are specifically increasing in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) [1,2]. Countries in SSA are at different stages of the transition, with the majority moving from under- to over-nutrition [35].…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
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“…Hypertension (raised blood pressure [BP], >140 mm Hg systolic BP, and/or >90 mm Hg diastolic BP) ranks as the third‐most important risk factor for global burden of disease,1 responsible for considerable and increasing noncommunicable diseases burden and mortality 1, 2. This condition affects more than 1 billion people worldwide with a global prevalence of close to 20%.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%