2018
DOI: 10.18632/aging.101501
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Abstract: Aging is believed to be the result of alterations of protein expression and accumulation of changes in biomolecules. Although there are numerous reports demonstrating changes in protein expression in brain during aging, only few of them describe global changes at the protein level. Here, we present the deepest quantitative proteomic analysis of three brain regions, hippocampus, cortex and cerebellum, in mice aged 1 or 12 months, using the total protein approach technique. In all the brain regions, both in youn… Show more

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Cited by 16 publications
(14 citation statements)
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References 55 publications
(62 reference statements)
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“…Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity cortical proteins showed altered levels in the 16-month-old vs. the 4-month-old mouse brain, and these proteins were involved in mitochondrial function, energy metabolism, synaptic function, the cytoplasmic ribosomal pathway, transcriptional regulation, and oxidative stress. Aging seemed to have a more pronounced effect on protein levels in the hippocampus than those in the cerebral cortex, as noted in previous proteomic studies of mouse brain [10,21], whereas the main pathways affected are shared between the two regions encompassing altered mitochondrial dynamics, synapse proteins, and oxidative stress in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex, with transcriptional regulation, energy metabolism, and changes in the cytoplasmic ribosome pathway more obvious in the hippocampus of aged mice. In this study, samples in each age group were pooled together to evaluate the differences of protein profiles among groups.…”
supporting
confidence: 65%
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“…Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity cortical proteins showed altered levels in the 16-month-old vs. the 4-month-old mouse brain, and these proteins were involved in mitochondrial function, energy metabolism, synaptic function, the cytoplasmic ribosomal pathway, transcriptional regulation, and oxidative stress. Aging seemed to have a more pronounced effect on protein levels in the hippocampus than those in the cerebral cortex, as noted in previous proteomic studies of mouse brain [10,21], whereas the main pathways affected are shared between the two regions encompassing altered mitochondrial dynamics, synapse proteins, and oxidative stress in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex, with transcriptional regulation, energy metabolism, and changes in the cytoplasmic ribosome pathway more obvious in the hippocampus of aged mice. In this study, samples in each age group were pooled together to evaluate the differences of protein profiles among groups.…”
supporting
confidence: 65%
“…Our observations suggest that aging causes a deficiency of synaptic connections and plasticity, supporting the theory of regulation or diminishment synaptic transmission with aging. A recent proteomics study of mouse brain found that in the learning and memory formation, the expression of some receptors and signaling cascade proteins of young and middle-aged mice is different significantly [10].…”
Section: Oxidative Stressmentioning
confidence: 99%
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“…For all experiments, we compared 10 week old, naïve animals with 13 week old, running wheel exposed, mice for the following reasons: (i) our strategy mimicked clinical conditions in which post-and pretreated conditions are compared. Particularly, physical activity has been suggested as a potential therapy to treat neurodegenerative diseases [17]; (ii) recent studies addressing proteomic changes during aging comparing 1 month or 6 months old rodents with 12 or 24 month old animals, respectively, reveal minor changes in the proteome (3%-5%) [22,23] indicating that aging is not significantly altering the steady-state proteome of the mature hippocampus. Supportive of this notion is a recent study showing that protein expression of 5 week and 20 week old animals is very similar [24].…”
Section: Epa Differently Impacts Adult Neurogenesis In Dorsal and Venmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Several studies have demonstrated that aging-related cognitive changes are accompanied by changes in the expression and/or localization of proteins involved in synaptic transmission and plasticity [6,8]. The expression of proteins in various regions of the rodent brain has been intensively studied by mass spectrometry-based proteomic techniques [9,10] and microarrays [11,12].…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%