2017
DOI: 10.4103/sni.sni_178_17
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Abstract: Background:Giant internal carotid artery (ICA) aneurysms extending into the sellar region, mimicking pituitary tumors, and causing pituitary dysfunction are relatively rare. Open surgery or endovascular treatment can treat these aneurysms, but achieving recovery of endocrine function is difficult.Case Description:A 56-year-old man presented with giant aneurysm of the ICA causing pituitary impairment, leading to disturbance of consciousness due to hyponatremia. High-flow bypass from the cervical external caroti… Show more

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Cited by 6 publications
(7 citation statements)
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References 28 publications
(40 reference statements)
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“…Aneurysm rupture has been considered rare, but 15% of cases were reported to present with acute aneurysm rupture (3). To prevent aneurysm rupture and reduce the mass effect on the pituitary, open surgery or endovascular treatment may be employed to treat aneurysms (1). Open surgery methods are hazardous and technically challenging (10).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…Aneurysm rupture has been considered rare, but 15% of cases were reported to present with acute aneurysm rupture (3). To prevent aneurysm rupture and reduce the mass effect on the pituitary, open surgery or endovascular treatment may be employed to treat aneurysms (1). Open surgery methods are hazardous and technically challenging (10).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Hypopituitarism typically occurs because of the compression of the normal pituitary by pituitary adenomas or nonpituitary tumors. Giant internal carotid artery aneurysms sometimes extend into the sellar region and mimic pituitary tumors, resulting in hypopituitarism due to the compression of the normal pituitary or hypothalamus (1). Although it very rarely causes hypopituitarism, a previous study found that 7 (0.17%) of 4,087 patients with hypopituitarism were found to have hypopituitarism due to an intrasellar aneurysm (2).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Conversely, a 1-month follow-up of another patient with a supradiaphragmatic aneurysm and pituitary insufficiency exhibited excellent recovery with hormone supplementation; however, serum hormone levels were not specified in the follow-up [ 3 ]. In addition, an 8-year follow-up of a patient with pituitary dysfunction caused by a giant cavernous carotid aneurysm treated with high-flow bypass demonstrated pituitary function recovery and shrinkage of the aneurysm [ 12 ]. In our case, a 2-year follow-up of serum hormone levels performed without an intermediate-stage examination revealed complete or partial improvement of levels of certain hormones such as TSH, FT3, FT4, and testosterone.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…On the next day, high-flow bypass was conducted as described previously. [ 4 5 6 ] Neuroanesthesia was induced under the monitoring of somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs) of the left extremities. The right cervical carotid bifurcation was exposed, a curvilinear frontotemporal skin incision was made, and the superficial temporal artery (STA) was meticulously prepared under the operating microscope.…”
Section: Case Reportmentioning
confidence: 99%