2016
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Abstract: We established rat embryonic stem (ES) cell lines from a double transgenic rat line which harbours CAG-GFP for ubiquitous expression of GFP in somatic cells and Acr3-EGFP for expression in sperm (green body and green sperm: GBGS rat). By injecting the GBGS rat ES cells into mouse blastocysts and transplanting them into pseudopregnant mice, rat spermatozoa were produced in mouse←rat ES chimeras. Rat spermatozoa from the chimeric testis were able to fertilize eggs by testicular sperm extraction combined with int… Show more

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Cited by 13 publications
(11 citation statements)
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References 32 publications
(50 reference statements)
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“…Rat thymus was generated into nude mice, by mouse blastocyst complementation with rat ESCs . The same group was also able to generate chimeric mice carrying functional spermatogeneic tissue derived from rat ESCs . More interestingly, similar results were obtained by Tsukiyama et al.…”
Section: Xenogeneic Blastocyst Complementationsupporting
confidence: 53%
“…Rat thymus was generated into nude mice, by mouse blastocyst complementation with rat ESCs . The same group was also able to generate chimeric mice carrying functional spermatogeneic tissue derived from rat ESCs . More interestingly, similar results were obtained by Tsukiyama et al.…”
Section: Xenogeneic Blastocyst Complementationsupporting
confidence: 53%
“…Interspecific blastocyst complementation using Prdm14 KO rat with mouse ESCs or iPSCs can generate functional mouse male germ cells in rats. While rat PSCs can contribute to germline even in wild-type mouse 12 , 41 , 42 , we hardly find mouse PGCs in rat gonads in the presence of the host rat PGCs (Supplementary Fig. 4b ).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 77%
“…Ideally, a new animal model would mimic the self-injury behavior found in humans solely due to HPRT deficiency. However, based on the results of the mouse [Jinnah et al, 1992] and rat [Isotani et al, 2016] Hprt1 knockout models, it is possible that self-injury due to a loss of HPRT may only occur in a CNS that is more analogous to humans than those found in rodents. Therefore, a logical step in animal modeling for LNS would be nonhuman primates, although the high costs and uncertain results of creating such a knockout [Kang et al, 2015] might outweigh the potential benefits of a new Hprt1 knockout model.…”
Section: New Tools To Investigate Lnsmentioning
confidence: 99%