2001
DOI: 10.1080/01650250042000078
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Abstract: Infants’ visual preferences for gender-stereotyped toys and their knowledge of stereotyped toys were examined in two experiments using an adaptation of the preferential looking paradigm. Girls and boys aged 12, 18, and 24 months were tested for their preference for photos of vehicles or dolls, and for whether they associated (“matched”) these two stereotyped sets of toys with the faces and voices of male and female children. Results of Experiment 1 (N = 77) demonstrated significant preferences for gender stere… Show more

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Cited by 169 publications
(131 citation statements)
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References 48 publications
(131 reference statements)
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“…The play materials used in the current study were developed after an extensive review of literature (Caldera, Huston & O'Brien, 1989;Campenni, 1999;Fein, Johnson, Kosson, Stork & Wasserman, 1985;Kim, 2002;Roopnarine, Ahmeduzzaman, Hossain & Reigraf, 1992;Serbin, Poulin-Dubois, Colburne, Sen & Eichstedt, 2001;Suito & Reifel, 1992;Wegener-Spohring, 1989;Weintraub et al, 1984). These play materials had been mentioned in the previous research as being appropriate either for boys or girls or as being gender neutral.…”
Section: Tools Of Measurementmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Older children clearly use cognitive ideas about gender (some of which may come from cultural norms) in their play; much of the current thinking about sex segregation focuses on the importance of gender-related sociolinguistic categories to children (Bandura & Bussey 2004, Kyratzis 2004, Martin & Ruble 2004 and argues that children choose playmates on the basis of their categorical understanding of their own gender and that of other children (Powlishta et al 1993, Serbin et al 2001). These arguments follow Kohlberg's (1966) ideas about the importance of cognitive knowledge about gender, such as knowledge of its constancy.…”
Section: The Developmental Course Of Gendermentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Therefore, one key difference between males and females in these studies is that males actually show a toy preference while females do not! A number of other studies of children's toy play and toy preference have reported similar pattern of toy choice with girls playing about equally with all types of toys and males showing a strong bias for male toys (e.g., Carter and Levy, 1988;Campbell et al, 2000;Serbin et al, 2001;O'Brien and Huston, 1985). Note, however, that other studies of toy choice in human children (e.g., Caldera et al, 1989;Pasterski et al, 2005;Pomerleau et al, 1990) and vervet monkeys (Alexander and Hines, 2002) find that females prefer female toys to male toys, suggesting that the methods of testing (e.g., presenting male and female toys simultaneously or sequentially), types of toys presented (e.g., dolls vs. trucks or cosmetics vs. weapons) and the socialization that occurs with age may, under some test conditions, increase female's interest in some toys.…”
Section: What Is the Difference Between Boys' And Girls' Toy Choice?mentioning
confidence: 82%
“…No sex difference in looking time emerged, but girls fixated more times on the doll than the truck, while boys did not discriminate (Alexander, Wilcox, & Woods, 2009). Other studies however find early sex-differentiated perceptual preferences only for boys at 9 months (Campbell, Shirley, Haywood, & Crook, 2000) or not at all (e.g., Serbin, Poulin-Dubois, Colburne, Sen, & Eichstedt, 2001).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 94%
“…Toys aimed at boys often promote action while toys aimed at girls often emphasize presentation or human aspects over functionality-notwithstanding the very loud and vehement responses to egregious examples of such distinction. The genderization of toys starts very early [22] and it is unclear (and endlessly controversial) if toy preference is innate or acquired. Several attempts have been made to develop toys that cater to gender preferences while still encouraging aspirations (such as the recently launched iBesties 4 , which are meant to encourage girls into technical roles).…”
Section: Before University: Society and Schoolmentioning
confidence: 99%