1999
DOI: 10.1177/00131649921970044 View full text |Buy / Rent full text
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Abstract: The present study explored gender differences in answers to constructed-response mathematics items. Features relevant and irrelevant to the scoring rubric but possibly related to gender differences were identified by a content expert after a review of the literature. Raters were trained to score the identified features for approximately 500 papers evenly divided across two grade levels and between genders. The papers rated for these features had holistic scores assigned by local teachers using a state-provided… Show more

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“…There were significant test score differences in favor of the boys in both gifted and average-ability students (d = 0.66). Using the 1996 Kansas Mathematics Assessment, Pomplun and Capps (1999) explored gender differences in answers to constructed-response mathematics items. They found that the effect sizes of seventh and 10th grade for 1996 Kansas Mathematics Assessment ranged from -0.08 to 0.19.…”
Section: Meta-analyses On Gender Differences In Mathematics and Readingmentioning
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“…There were significant test score differences in favor of the boys in both gifted and average-ability students (d = 0.66). Using the 1996 Kansas Mathematics Assessment, Pomplun and Capps (1999) explored gender differences in answers to constructed-response mathematics items. They found that the effect sizes of seventh and 10th grade for 1996 Kansas Mathematics Assessment ranged from -0.08 to 0.19.…”
Section: Meta-analyses On Gender Differences In Mathematics and Readingmentioning
“…Nevertheless, this perspective merely glances at gender differences, providing a snapshot of the gap between genders at some point or relating gender differences to other factors such as background and metacognitive aspects but failing to provide didactic information about the nature of these differences (differences that usually disadvantage girls more than boys), or explaining whether these differences are typically related to just some items or may concern all the test items. In this direction, part of the literature explores gender differences in relation to specific sub-domains of mathematical ability (for example, arguing that boys outperform girls in spatial ability and, more generally, in geometry items; e.g., [6,7]), other works at item level find a correlation between item difficulty and gender differences (e.g., [8,9]), and, finally, some studies examine the influence of item type in relation to gender (for instance, showing that boys outperform girls in multiplechoice items rather than constructed-response items, in which girls display better results; e.g., [10][11][12][13]). Less research has been carried out on possible relationships between task formulation and gender differences in relation to specific items, especially from a didactic perspective, considering the didactic milieu either as involved in the causes, or as an actor participating in the resolution.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning