2017
DOI: 10.3389/fpsyg.2017.00451
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Abstract: Over the past years the percentage of female entrepreneurs has increased, yet it is still far below of that for males. Although various attempts have been made to explain differences in mens’ and women’s entrepreneurial attitudes and intentions, the extent to which those differences are due to self-report biases has not been yet considered. The present study utilized Differential Item Functioning (DIF) to compare men and women’s reporting on entrepreneurial intentions. DIF occurs in situations where members of… Show more

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Cited by 39 publications
(44 citation statements)
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References 40 publications
(44 reference statements)
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“…The process of increasing the perception of attractiveness toward the idea of investing in a new venture has a direct impact on entrepreneurial intentions [67]. According to Van Kleef (2009), emotional expressions have important social functions, influencing attitudes towards certain perspectives or issues [68].…”
Section: Factors Affecting Desirability Of Entrepreneurship and Entrementioning
confidence: 99%
“…The process of increasing the perception of attractiveness toward the idea of investing in a new venture has a direct impact on entrepreneurial intentions [67]. According to Van Kleef (2009), emotional expressions have important social functions, influencing attitudes towards certain perspectives or issues [68].…”
Section: Factors Affecting Desirability Of Entrepreneurship and Entrementioning
confidence: 99%
“…One of the research streams in the entrepreneurship literature and, in specific, in the entrepreneurial intention literature has been the role of gender in the formation of entrepreneurial intentions. Research data suggest that career patterns vary across genders and that despite the increased participation of women in the enterprise sector, there are still almost twice as many male entrepreneurs (Shinnar, Giacomin, & Janssen, 2012;Shirokova, Osiyevskyy, & Bogatyreva, 2016;Zampetakis, Bakatsaki, Litos, Kafetsios, & Moustakis, 2017;Zhao, Seibert, & Hills, 2005). This is mainly attributed to the perception of entrepreneurship as something most suited to males who are widely perceived as being more predisposed to engage into entrepreneurial activity than women and as possessing qualities or characteristics, such as independence, aggressiveness, autonomy, and courage, typically considered essential for entrepreneurship (Shinnar et al, 2012;Shirokova et al, 2016;Zhao et al, 2005).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…PFE based on a single question, where respondents were asked "whether your parent had started and run a business before" where (1=yes; 2=no). Control Variables: previous research proposed that demographic characteristics seem to have influence on entrepreneurial intentions (Zampetakis et al, 2017). Therefore, this study considers respondents' demographics as control variables; gender (dummy variable, male=0, female=1), age (<20=1, 21-25=2, 26-30=3 and 31>=4), degree level (bachelors=1, masters=2 and other=3), university affiliation (public=1, private=2), after work preferences (Govt.…”
Section: Methodsmentioning
confidence: 99%