2011
DOI: 10.1111/j.1467-9515.2011.00815.x
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Abstract: A common argument in the social policy literature is that ethnic and identity-based heterogeneity undermines the welfare state. In part, this happens because of difficulties in the generation of broad social solidarity in diverse societies: solidarity which is allegedly necessary for sustaining public support for the welfare state. This study explores this argument's logic in the context of welfare state politics in Israel. Israel would appear to be a near-perfect example of how heterogeneity strains social so… Show more

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Cited by 2 publications
(2 citation statements)
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References 21 publications
(28 reference statements)
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“…Table presents the categorizations. We also included Israel, which is an interesting case of a mixed model because it incorporates a historical base of social‐democratic features with aspects of the liberal and southern European regimes (Doron ) and is known for its heterogeneous populations (Zehavi ). We looked at the different levels of trust of public officials and non‐public officials in different countries and in different regimes.…”
Section: Independent Variablesmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Table presents the categorizations. We also included Israel, which is an interesting case of a mixed model because it incorporates a historical base of social‐democratic features with aspects of the liberal and southern European regimes (Doron ) and is known for its heterogeneous populations (Zehavi ). We looked at the different levels of trust of public officials and non‐public officials in different countries and in different regimes.…”
Section: Independent Variablesmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Conversely, a range of scholars argue that since ELF and related arguments lack socio-historical embedding (Wimmer, 2015), they offer incomplete causal chains (Baldwin and Huber, 2010: 659), which can only be fully understood by adding broader factors (ideologies, coalition-making and so on) (Taylor-Gooby, 2005; Zehavi, 2012). Against this background, the present article questions whether welfare policymaking is indeed the exclusive purview of established nations.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%