2017
DOI: 10.18632/aging.101352
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Abstract: Frailty is a complex manifestation of aging and associated with increased risk of mortality and poor health outcomes. However, younger individuals (under 65 years) are less-studied in this respect. Also, the relationship between frailty and cause-specific mortality in community settings is understudied. We used a 42-item Rockwood-based frailty index (FI) in the Swedish Adoption/Twin Study of Aging (n=1477; 623 men, 854 women; aged 29-95 years) and analyzed its association with all-cause and cause-specific mort… Show more

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Cited by 37 publications
(36 citation statements)
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References 29 publications
(46 reference statements)
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“…Third, we had a very long follow-up, up to 20 years for all-cause mortality and up to 17 years for cause-specific mortality, which enables us to draw conclusions on the long-term predictive ability of the FI. Indeed, the associations in this study demonstrate that the FI is predictive of mortality in a long-term follow-up and align with a previous study by our group, in which we demonstrated that the FI is predictive of allcause mortality for up to 30 years [24].…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
confidence: 92%
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“…Third, we had a very long follow-up, up to 20 years for all-cause mortality and up to 17 years for cause-specific mortality, which enables us to draw conclusions on the long-term predictive ability of the FI. Indeed, the associations in this study demonstrate that the FI is predictive of mortality in a long-term follow-up and align with a previous study by our group, in which we demonstrated that the FI is predictive of allcause mortality for up to 30 years [24].…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
confidence: 92%
“…Several studies with wide age spectra have nevertheless suggested that a negative effect of increased FI on mortality could also be observed in younger adults [14,[22][23][24]. In fact, previous findings by others [22] and us [24,25] have suggested that the frailty-mortality association is relatively stronger among the young than the old. In the present study, we modeled the effect in a time-dependent manner and found that for all causes, higher FI was associated with a greater relative risk of mortality at younger ages and the associations attenuated towards the oldest ages.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 97%
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“…The blood cell type distributions (monocytes, granulocytes, B cells, CD4 and CD8 and NK cells) for both clocks were assessed in the Horvath online calculator ( https://dnamage.genetics.ucla.edu/home ) using the Houseman method (Houseman et al 2012 ). Construction and validation of an FI, also called a deficit accumulation model, for the second SATSA questionnaire wave in 1987 has been previously described (Jiang et al 2017 ). The FIs for IPTs 3, 5 and 6 used in this study were constructed identically to the 1987 questionnaire wave.…”
Section: Methodsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…An individual's FI score constitutes of the number of deficits (for that individual) divided by the total number of deficits composing the FI. Detailed descriptions of the creation and validation of the FIs were reported elsewhere, see (25) for UKB, (26) for SATSA, and (manuscript under submission) for SALT. For a detailed description of the FI in AO50 study see Supplementary Materials.…”
Section: Frailty Indexmentioning
confidence: 99%