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“…Measurements most useful in the facial pattern recognition of the HED gene carriers were-1. abnormally narrow and short maxillary width and palatal depth dimensions In the past facial characteristics of the HED affected individuals have been described on the basis of clinical evaluations [Weech, 1929;Thannhauser, 1936;Singh et al, 1962;Reed et al, 1970;Brownstein, 1973;Gorlin et al, 1976;Soderholm and Kaitila, 19851 or quantitative facial findings [Brodie and Sarnat, 1942;Sarnat et al, 1953;Lipshutz, 1963;Harbour, 1981;Ward and Bixler, 1987;Bixler et al, 19881, as having a prominent forehead, a depressed nasal root and bridge, small cranial length and facial height, a n underdeveloped midface, a small palatal depth, and a short lower face with a small chin. Morphometric facial evaluation supported the presence of these same craniofacial anomalies in the HED gene carriers.…”
Section: Results Facial Morphologymentioning
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“…Measurements most useful in the facial pattern recognition of the HED gene carriers were-1. abnormally narrow and short maxillary width and palatal depth dimensions In the past facial characteristics of the HED affected individuals have been described on the basis of clinical evaluations [Weech, 1929;Thannhauser, 1936;Singh et al, 1962;Reed et al, 1970;Brownstein, 1973;Gorlin et al, 1976;Soderholm and Kaitila, 19851 or quantitative facial findings [Brodie and Sarnat, 1942;Sarnat et al, 1953;Lipshutz, 1963;Harbour, 1981;Ward and Bixler, 1987;Bixler et al, 19881, as having a prominent forehead, a depressed nasal root and bridge, small cranial length and facial height, a n underdeveloped midface, a small palatal depth, and a short lower face with a small chin. Morphometric facial evaluation supported the presence of these same craniofacial anomalies in the HED gene carriers.…”
Section: Results Facial Morphologymentioning
“…Functional matrices such as the soft tissues of the oral cavity are likely to influence sexual dimorphism of the mandible because they are a major component of facial growth. This is emphasized by studies of children with complete anodontia (Brodie and Sarnat,1942; Ochiai et al,1961; Sarnat et al,1963). Growth of the muscles and the oral cavity assure the balance in facial dimensions so that the facial proportions and angles are maintained as in normal patients but the alveolar bones of the mandible and the maxilla are completely absent.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
“…Ogaard and Krogstad 4 reported that, with increasing hypodontia severity, the degree of retroclination of the upper and lower incisors and the interincisal angle increased, while the mandibular plane and the SNA angles decreased in Norwegian children with 2 to 10 or more congenitally missing teeth. On the other hand, in a longitudinal investigation of a patient with complete hypodontia (ectodermal dysplasia), Sarnat et al 5 reported that the facial skeleton developed normally.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning