2009
DOI: 10.2202/1540-8884.1273
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Abstract: Much of the commentary in the wake of last month's presidential election has focused on the magnitude and historic aspects of Barack Obama's victory and the deteriorating economic environment in which it played out. Little thought has been given to the influence of foreign affairs in the election. Yet even in this year's contest, which appears to lend considerable support to economic-based theories of elections, international events clearly played an important role by shaping the nomination process for both ma… Show more

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Cited by 5 publications
(4 citation statements)
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“…Too little attention has been paid so far to Obama's foreign policy during the 2008 campaign or to the manner in which he mirrored Nixon's approach to an inherited "war of choice" to secure his party's nomination and then the presidency. The orthodox narrative (Bligh & Kohles, 2009;Hollander, 2010;Kinder & Dale-Riddle, 2012;Lee & Morin, 2009;Saldin, 2008) is that the 2008 Democratic primary season focused on issues of race and the personality clash between Obama and Hillary Clinton, while the general election turned on the state of the American economy. This is not to suggest that nothing has been written on Obama's approach to foreign policy in general or to the war in Iraq specifically, but the role of foreign policy in the 2008 campaign has received insufficient attention to date.…”
Section: Theoretical Basismentioning
confidence: 99%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…Too little attention has been paid so far to Obama's foreign policy during the 2008 campaign or to the manner in which he mirrored Nixon's approach to an inherited "war of choice" to secure his party's nomination and then the presidency. The orthodox narrative (Bligh & Kohles, 2009;Hollander, 2010;Kinder & Dale-Riddle, 2012;Lee & Morin, 2009;Saldin, 2008) is that the 2008 Democratic primary season focused on issues of race and the personality clash between Obama and Hillary Clinton, while the general election turned on the state of the American economy. This is not to suggest that nothing has been written on Obama's approach to foreign policy in general or to the war in Iraq specifically, but the role of foreign policy in the 2008 campaign has received insufficient attention to date.…”
Section: Theoretical Basismentioning
confidence: 99%
“…This article rectifies this by examining Obama's specific use of continuing conflict to neutralize his party rivals in the primaries and defeat his opponent in the general election. A concerted effort to address the subject was attempted by Saldin (2008) in his Forum article, "Foreign Policy in the 2008 Election." However, while he reminds us that material on the 2008 election "is incomplete because it does not take foreign affairs seriously" (p. 1), the article is not sufficiently focused upon Obama's utilization of policy.…”
Section: Theoretical Basismentioning
confidence: 99%
“…In previous work, I have highlighted the way in which international crises in general, and wars in particular, have shaped elections and upset the fragile realignment framework (Saldin 2008;2011). Of course, as the 2010 midterms aptly demonstrate, wars do not always dominate campaigns and elections, even when the United States is actively involved in them.…”
Section: A Short History Of Presidential Health Care Initiativesmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Additionally, the Cold War and its subsidiary conflicts in Korea and Vietnam may have bolstered the GOP at various points. And while it may be too early to draw definitive conclusions about the on-going war in Iraq, it certainly seems possible that this conflict played an important role in the Democratic ascendency that began in 2006 (Saldin 2008).…”
Section: Realignment Theory Reconsideredmentioning
confidence: 99%