2019
DOI: 10.1093/aob/mcz028
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Fire and legume germination in a tropical savanna: ecological and historical factors

Abstract: Background and Aims In many flammable ecosystems, physically dormant seeds show dormancy-break patterns tied to fire, but the link between heat shock and germination in the tropical savannas of Africa and South America remains controversial. Seed heat tolerance is important, preventing seed mortality during fire passage, and is usually predicted by seed traits. This study investigated the role of fire frequency (ecological effects) and seed traits through phylogenetic comparison (historical e… Show more

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Cited by 35 publications
(38 citation statements)
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“…Since fire regime is expected to shape post-fire regeneration strategies (Bond & Midgley, 2003;Keeley et al, 2012), we expect resprouting to be the main regeneration strategy in the Cerrado (Bond & Midgley, 2001;Clarke et al, 2015;Pilon et al, 2020) Zirondi, José et al, 2019). We also expect propagules to be tolerant to fire-related temperatures (Daibes et al, 2019), remaining ungerminated (yet viable) until the onset of the rainy season (Escobar et al, 2018). (Coutinho, 1978).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 97%
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“…Since fire regime is expected to shape post-fire regeneration strategies (Bond & Midgley, 2003;Keeley et al, 2012), we expect resprouting to be the main regeneration strategy in the Cerrado (Bond & Midgley, 2001;Clarke et al, 2015;Pilon et al, 2020) Zirondi, José et al, 2019). We also expect propagules to be tolerant to fire-related temperatures (Daibes et al, 2019), remaining ungerminated (yet viable) until the onset of the rainy season (Escobar et al, 2018). (Coutinho, 1978).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 97%
“…Heat shocks caused by fire have been reported to stimulate germination in several species of fire-prone ecosystems, such as those in Australia and in the Mediterranean region, mainly in hard-seeded species in which high temperatures may break physical dormancy, thus enabling germination (Auld & O'Connell, 1991;Williams et al, 2003;Reyes & Trabaud, 2009;Moreira et al, 2010;Moreira & Pausas, 2012). Nonetheless, heat shocks have shown little to no effect among species of South America, although most seeds were able to survive the exposure to high temperatures, which is considered a tolerance trait in face of fires (Jaureguiberry & Diaz, 2015;Le Stradic et al, 2015;Ribeiro et al, 2015;Fichino et al, 2016;Fidelis et al, 2016;Zupo et al, 2016;Gómez-González et al, 2017;Daibes et al, 2019;Zirondi, José, et al, 2019).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
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“…No results were found associating PY with another kind of dormancy, for example, with physiological dormancy (combinational dormancy). In the case of Chamaecrista, the second largest genus in this subtribe, the investigations also found PY as the only kind of dormancy occurring in these seeds [68][69][70][71][72] . The results found in the present study also corroborate with the evidence that impermeability to water is a prevailing trait in seeds of this subtribe, since PY was found in all Cassia species.…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 83%
“…One of the main hypotheses related to the evolution of dormancy states that dormancy is selected where seasonality and environmental uncertainty are high (Baskin and Baskin, 2014). Thus, we expect a larger proportion of dormant species in open savannas, where fire frequency, environmental unpredictability, and drought severity are greater than in closed savannas (Franco, 2002;Oliveira-Filho and Ratter, 2002;Rossatto et al, 2012;Salazar et al, 2012;Daibes et al, 2019; Figure 1). In contrast, higher environmental predictability in closed savannas should select non-dormant species because of the costs associated with the evolution of dormancy (Baskin and Baskin, 2014;Dayrell et al, 2017).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 98%