2014
|
Sign up to set email alerts
|

Abstract: Critical GIS emphasized the ways in which social, political, and economic inequalities are (re)produced through spatial information technologies and attendant practices. In the mid-1990s through the early 2000s, feminist interventions challenged the presumed gender neutrality and universality of GIS and brought gender to the fore of Critical GIS concerns. However, the rise of nascent web-based spatial information technologies-or new spatial media-signals the need to extend this work to determine how it is that… Show more

Help me understand this report

Search citation statements

Order By: Relevance

Paper Sections

Select...
1
1
1

Citation Types

0
42
0

Year Published

2015
2015
2017
2017

Publication Types

Select...
2
1
1
1

Relationship

1
4

Authors

Journals

citations
Cited by 87 publications
(42 citation statements)
references
References 46 publications
(34 reference statements)
0
42
0
Order By: Relevance
“…As geographic information systems (GIS) became entrenched as a mainstream presence within the discipline, critical cartography likewise influenced the flourishing of Critical GIS, which constituted a concerted effort at incorporating what were at the time trenchant critiques of the technology and its attendant practices (see Pickles 1995). Critical GIS drew on feminist critiques of both science and (scientific) representation to challenge the supposed neutrality of GIS (see Leszczynski and Elwood, 2015). Feminist critiques of science were used to further challenge the inherent epistemological limitations of GIS artefacts (maps) and practices of discretization in two additional ways.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…As geographic information systems (GIS) became entrenched as a mainstream presence within the discipline, critical cartography likewise influenced the flourishing of Critical GIS, which constituted a concerted effort at incorporating what were at the time trenchant critiques of the technology and its attendant practices (see Pickles 1995). Critical GIS drew on feminist critiques of both science and (scientific) representation to challenge the supposed neutrality of GIS (see Leszczynski and Elwood, 2015). Feminist critiques of science were used to further challenge the inherent epistemological limitations of GIS artefacts (maps) and practices of discretization in two additional ways.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Public participation GIS, participatory GIS, community-integrated GIS, and critical GIS all help build reflective strategies for researchers investigating and designing maps, while also providing tools to analyze and understand outcomes [8]- [10].…”
Section: Th International Conference On Ict For Sustainability (Ict4mentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Sarah Elwood and her co-researchers have begun to research different aspects of collaborative and community-based mapping, to offer a critical interpretation of big data and the Geoweb, reorienting attention to the power of technical and political infrastructures in privileging certain kinds of information, moments, or affordances, and drawing attention to the exclusions that are normalized in the apparently neutral specifications of mapping projects on the Geoweb (see Elwood 2010aElwood , b, 2011Elwood and Leszczynski 2012). This kind of research also draws attention to the importance of the research discourse around Geoweb projects, that script a boosterist neogeographic agendain which VGI remains somehow separate from the powerful forces of commerce that maneuver around the technology, deploying it as part of their accumulation strategies (see Leszczynski and Elwood 2014). Technical research elides the social and political context of Geoweb projects and in so doing allows them to advance as "new", without having to think about why or how they are advancing.…”
Section: Social Science Perspectives On the Transformation Of Geoinfomentioning
confidence: 99%