2014
DOI: 10.1590/1678-6001
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Abstract: Livestock manure may contain pathogenic microorganisms which pose a risk to the health of animal or humans if the manure is not adequately treated or disposed of. To determine the fate of Shiga toxigenic Escherichia coli (STEC) non O157 in composted manure from naturally colonized sheep, fresh manure was obtained from animals carrying bacterial cells with stx1/ stx2 genes. Two composting systems were used, aerated and non-aerated, and the experiments were done in Dracena city, São Paulo State. Every week, for … Show more

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Cited by 6 publications
(4 citation statements)
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“…Prolonged survival may occur because the original host body temperature is warmer than typical environmental temperatures and so the compost must reach thermophilic conditions throughout the pile for a sufficient length of time to reduce the potential pathogen load. Furthermore, the work of Marin et al [ 70 ] underscores the difficulty in eradicating some pathogens, in their case shigatoxigenic E . coli , when composting occurs for less than two months, even when reaching 61°C (non-aerated piles) or 66°C (aerated piles) during some portion of that time.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Prolonged survival may occur because the original host body temperature is warmer than typical environmental temperatures and so the compost must reach thermophilic conditions throughout the pile for a sufficient length of time to reduce the potential pathogen load. Furthermore, the work of Marin et al [ 70 ] underscores the difficulty in eradicating some pathogens, in their case shigatoxigenic E . coli , when composting occurs for less than two months, even when reaching 61°C (non-aerated piles) or 66°C (aerated piles) during some portion of that time.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…In addition to stabilizing nutrients and OM, which results in a longer-term availability of essential nutrients and a positive effect on soil microbial activity and biomass [51], composting is a well-known mechanism for minimizing or eliminating many unwanted effects of the application of raw organic waste to agricultural soil [25]. Composting, through the hygienization of organic waste, can significantly mitigate the risk of incorporation of potential human pathogens into the soil ecosystem, although it may not entirely prevent the regrowth of pathogenic strains [152,202,203]. Moreover, composting is acknowledged to be an effective measure to alleviate antimicrobial resistance during the application of organic amendments to agricultural soil [204,205].…”
Section: Overcoming the Drawbacksmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…No entanto, o que se observa nos trabalhos disponíveis na literatura é uma baixa frequência da coleta de dados de temperatura, como é o caso do estudo de COTTA et al (2015) onde os autores monitoraram as temperaturas apenas aos 7, 14, 21 e 28 dias após o início do experimento e de MARIN et al (2014) que coletaram os dados semanalmente, por sete semanas. Outros trabalhos monitoraram diariamente, porém com uma coleta de dados apenas.…”
Section: A Temperatura No Processo De Compostagemunclassified