2021
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Abstract: The global treeline phenomenon follows a common seasonal mean temperature (isotherm) of about 6°C. When the isotherm moves upslope because of rapid climatic warming, trees are left behind and are absent from the climatic tree limit. This commentary recalls the discrepancy between the actual uppermost position of trees and the potential (climatic) treeline. Temperature‐based models can predict the potential treeline only (comment to Camarero et al., Global Change Biology, 27, 1879–1889, 2021). The photograph sh… Show more

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Cited by 8 publications
(9 citation statements)
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References 9 publications
(9 reference statements)
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“…The explanatory power of growth variation based on temperature models did not evenly increase with elevation confirming threshold growth responses to temperature at treeline (Paulsen et al, 2000). According to Körner (2021), such variation would be explained by differential growth enhancement by climate warming shifting upwards or polewards. He suggests that once a threshold is surpassed, thermal effects diminish, and this would explain our findings because growth of 20th-century treeline trees will not be any more limited by low temperature since they will not form the "climatic treeline."…”
Section: Tree Growth and Treeline Responses To Temperature: Different Questions And Conceptsmentioning
confidence: 88%
“…In his letter to the editor, Körner (2021) commented on our recent assessment of climate impacts on tree growth at treeline (Camarero et al, 2021). We share some of his opinions such as the nonlinear responses of growth to temperature.…”
Section: Tree Growth and Treeline Responses To Temperature: Different Questions And Conceptsmentioning
confidence: 98%
“…(4) It was noted with surprise, whenever tested, that isolated populations of alpine plant species are genetically very diverse [81,82]. (5) The advance of trees is much slower than the ongoing upslope shift of the isotherm, leaving trees and adjacent alpine terrain behind, and thus, exposed to higher than treeline-temperature [8,83]. As tree recruitment follows the isotherm shift, a new, fragmented, topography-related ecotone will be established at higher than the current elevation.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Despite significant research efforts relating to treelines around the world, some uncertainties still remain concerning the nonlinear response of global treelines to recent climate warming. While there is consensus that 20th-century macroclimate warming has played a pivotal role in triggering a recent upward expansion of alpine treelines (e.g., Kullman, 2007;Liang et al, 2016), the feedback of emerging contingent fine-scale factors is still a matter of debate (e.g., Camarero et al, 2021;Körner, 2021a), as are detailed other local mechanisms that may contribute to treeline position or limit the ability of trees to respond to climate change (Harsch & Bader, 2011).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Despite significant research efforts relating to treelines around the world, some uncertainties still remain concerning the nonlinear response of global treelines to recent climate warming. While there is consensus that 20th‐century macroclimate warming has played a pivotal role in triggering a recent upward expansion of alpine treelines (e.g., Kullman, 2007 ; Liang et al, 2016 ), the feedback of emerging contingent fine‐scale factors is still a matter of debate (e.g., Camarero et al, 2021 ; Körner, 2021a ), as are detailed other local mechanisms that may contribute to treeline position or limit the ability of trees to respond to climate change (Harsch & Bader, 2011 ). For example, topographical conditions coupled with local (e.g., extreme winds, snow avalanches, rockfall) and anthropogenic (e.g., fires, grazing by livestock) disturbances can significantly depress treeline elevation compared to their climatic potential (Ameztegui et al, 2016 ; Bonanomi et al, 2020 ; Harsch et al, 2012 ; Holtmeier & Broll, 2020 ).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%