2017
DOI: 10.3389/fpsyg.2017.00555 View full text |Buy / Rent full text
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Abstract: Previous studies have suggested that children and adults form cognitive representations of co-occurring word sequences. We propose (1) that the formation of such multi-word unit (MWU) representations precedes and facilitates the formation of single-word representations in children and thus benefits word learning, and (2) that MWU representations facilitate adult word recognition and thus benefit lexical processing. Using a modified version of an existing computational model (McCauley and Christiansen, 2014), w… Show more

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“…Our method extends previous work by Grimm et al (2017), who found that words contained in a large number of multi-word phrases tend to be learned early in development. Referring to Peters (1983), Grimm et al (2017) suggest that children store some phrases as undersegmented chunks. Chunks are then compared to one another in order to identify shared sub-units.…”
Section: Introductionsupporting
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“…Our method extends previous work by Grimm et al (2017), who found that words contained in a large number of multi-word phrases tend to be learned early in development. Referring to Peters (1983), Grimm et al (2017) suggest that children store some phrases as undersegmented chunks. Chunks are then compared to one another in order to identify shared sub-units.…”
Section: Introductionsupporting
“…Similarly, the chunk-based learner (CBL) model, which uses backward transitional probabilities between words to discover variably-sized multiword chunks in child-directed speech, provides a superior computational account of shallow parsing of parental input and linearisation of child-produced utterances compared to n-gram models across several different languages (Chater, McCauley, & Christiansen, 2016;McCauley & Christiansen, 2011. Moreover, the psycholinguistic validity of the chunks discovered by CBL has been independently verified (Grimm, Cassani, Gillis, & Daelemans, 2017). More generally, the neural activation patterns observed by Brennan et al (2016) and Nelson et al (2017) might reflect effects of chunking across different levels of linguistic representation (i.e.…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
“…The human brain is understood to "contain" not only morphologically simple words, but also inflected and derived forms, compounds, light verb constructions, collocations, idioms, proverbs, social routine clichés and pre-compiled routinized chunks maximizing processing opportunities (Jackendoff 2002). Recognition of idiomatic expressions and multi-word units provides strong evidence of a processing system that uses all available pieces of information as soon as possible to constrain memory search and speed up processing of the most highly expected input (Grimm et al 2017;McCauley and Christiansen 2017;Vespignani et al 2010). Likewise, deficits in the working memory span (e.g.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning