2002
DOI: 10.1080/01650250143000274
View full text |Buy / Rent full text
|
Sign up to set email alerts
|

Abstract: Care giving situations contain several features that offer opportunities for expanding the way that collaborative cognition is conceptualised and explored. These features are the presence of several possible contributors, more than one kind of change in participation, distinctions drawn among parts of a task, and differences in understanding based on interests. All represent departures from the traditional focus on dyads, tasks that emphasise one kind of change only, single problems, and differences in compete… Show more

Help me understand this report

Search citation statements

Order By: Relevance

Paper Sections

Select...
1
1
1
1

Citation Types

0
9
0

Year Published

2002
2002
2003
2003

Publication Types

Select...
3

Relationship

1
2

Authors

Journals

citations
Cited by 9 publications
(9 citation statements)
references
References 22 publications
(32 reference statements)
0
9
0
Order By: Relevance
“…Our previous work (Berg, Meegan, et al, 1998;Berg, Strough, et al, 1998; indicated that adults often involve others in their problem solving efforts, but that there is diversity in the form of collaboration (e.g., how actively engaged partners are, the extent of delegation, and division of labor). Similarly, Goodnow and Bowles' (1994) work on naturally occurring everyday collaborations involving household work suggests that daily collaborations may involve great diversity involving division of labor, parallel daily decision making, and joint and mutual collaboration (see also Goodnow, 2002, for collaboration in caregiving). To address these issues, we asked open-ended questions to gain an initial understanding of how collaboration occurs in couples' daily lives.…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Our previous work (Berg, Meegan, et al, 1998;Berg, Strough, et al, 1998; indicated that adults often involve others in their problem solving efforts, but that there is diversity in the form of collaboration (e.g., how actively engaged partners are, the extent of delegation, and division of labor). Similarly, Goodnow and Bowles' (1994) work on naturally occurring everyday collaborations involving household work suggests that daily collaborations may involve great diversity involving division of labor, parallel daily decision making, and joint and mutual collaboration (see also Goodnow, 2002, for collaboration in caregiving). To address these issues, we asked open-ended questions to gain an initial understanding of how collaboration occurs in couples' daily lives.…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Siblings may be an important problem-solving resource for widowed, divorced, or never married older adults without children, and may become increasingly important in future cohorts of Americans if divorce continues at current rates. Moreover, middle-aged and young-old siblings often must work collaboratively to deal with normative life events such as decisions about how to care for an aging parent (Goodnow et al, 2002). Thus, the sibling relationship may be a fruitful area of inquiry in future research on interpersonal relationships and collaborative everyday problem solving.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Adult children are expected to provide instrumental support for their aging parents (Hamon & Blieszner, 1990). Goodnow et al (2002) posit that caregiving is a collaborative cognitive activity in which adult offspring and their parents, and adult offspring and their siblings, work together to negotiate roles and responsibilities. Moreover, siblings can be an important source of support in later life for those without spouses or children (Bedford, 1995).…”
Section: Collaborative Relationshipsmentioning
confidence: 99%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…We are also faced firmly with the fact that people often draw distinctions among tasks in essentially social terms rather than in terms of their demands for various forms of competence or amounts of time. People regard some tasks, for example, as fairly moveable from one person to another and reject the movement or delegation of others as 'wrong' [e.g., Goodnow, 1996a;Goodnow et al, 2002].…”
Section: Consider Changes In the Sampling Of Situations And Tasksmentioning
confidence: 99%