Volume 2: Heat Transfer Enhancement for Practical Applications; Fire and Combustion; Multi-Phase Systems; Heat Transfer in Elec 2012
DOI: 10.1115/ht2012-58049 View full text |Buy / Rent full text
|
|

Abstract: The correct prediction of gas-liquid two phase pressure drop is of immense significance for proper sizing of industrial equipment and safety operations involved in chemical, energy and petrochemical applications. The hydrostatic component of the two phase pressure drop is predicted based on the accurate estimation of void fraction. However, there exists a complexity in correct estimation of the frictional component of two phase pressure drop owing to interfacial friction at dynamic gas-liquid interface. The pr… Show more

Help me understand this report

Search citation statements

Order By: Relevance
Select...
3
1
1
3
0

Year Published

2012
2012
2016
2016

Publication Types

Select...
1
1

Relationship

1
1

Authors

Journals

1
3
0
Order By: Relevance
“…On the basis of the deviation of the two phase pressure drop from its single phase counterpart as shown in Figures 5-9, it is clear that the parameter that increases with increasing gas flow rate might correlate the two phase and single phase heat transfer coefficients. Bhagwat et al [12] found the non-dimensional frictional pressure drop defined by Equation (2) to increase with increasing superficial gas Reynolds number (Re sg ) and with the trend similar to that observed for two phase heat transfer. The major advantage of using this form of the correlation based on the Reynolds analogy is that it accounts for change in the flow condition such as the pipe diameter and fluid combination through the (φ) parameter.…”
Section: Reynolds Analogysupporting
See 2 more Smart Citations
Create an account to read the remaining citation statements from this report. You will also get access to:
  • Search over 1.2b+ citation statments to see what is being said about any topic in the research literature
  • Advanced Search to find publications that support or contrast your research
  • Citation reports and visualizations to easily see what publications are saying about each other
  • Browser extension to see Smart Citations wherever you read research
  • Dashboards to evaluate and keep track of groups of publications
  • Alerts to stay on top of citations as they happen
  • Automated reference checks to make sure you are citing reliable research in your manuscripts
  • 7 day free preview of our premium features.

Trusted by researchers and organizations around the world

Over 130,000 students researchers, and industry experts at use scite

See what students are saying

rupbmjkragerfmgwileyiopcupepmcmbcthiemesagefrontiersapsiucrarxivemeralduhksmucshluniversity-of-gavle
“…On the basis of the deviation of the two phase pressure drop from its single phase counterpart as shown in Figures 5-9, it is clear that the parameter that increases with increasing gas flow rate might correlate the two phase and single phase heat transfer coefficients. Bhagwat et al [12] found the non-dimensional frictional pressure drop defined by Equation (2) to increase with increasing superficial gas Reynolds number (Re sg ) and with the trend similar to that observed for two phase heat transfer. The major advantage of using this form of the correlation based on the Reynolds analogy is that it accounts for change in the flow condition such as the pipe diameter and fluid combination through the (φ) parameter.…”
Section: Reynolds Analogysupporting
“…The problem with using Reynolds analogy is that it requires the frictional pressure drop data or a robust and accurate correlation to predict frictional pressure drop in different flow patterns. The isothermal frictional pressure drop data used to analyze Tang and Ghajar [1] correlation was obtained from the pressure drop measurements done by Bhagwat et al [12]. The Reynolds analogy given by Tang and Ghajar [1] is observed to predict the two phase convective heat transfer coefficient satisfactorily as shown in Figure 11.…”
Section: Reynolds Analogymentioning
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…In this case the friction factor is termed a two-phase friction factor and in reality, such methods are flow regime independent notably in the style of Lockhart -Martinelli (1949). The works of Klausner et al (1991), Dalkilic et al (2009) and Bhagwat et al (2012) are cases in point. Hewitt & Hall-Taylor (1970) have shown using the data of Gill et al (1964) that the homogeneous model method is less accurate than flow regime specific methods.…”
Section: Comparison Of Experimental Interfacial Friction Factor With mentioning