1988
DOI: 10.1055/s-2007-1022988
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Abstract: The ablation of atherosclerotic tissue by laser energy was a promising new idea in the treatment of atherosclerotic vascular diseases. Initial studies showed a lot of beneficial effects but also a lot of complications like perforations and thermal injuries. The introduction of a new fiber optic system with a metalcapped quartzfiber, changing the laser energy into thermal energy, showed significant improvements. First animal studies revealed a higher success rate and a significantly decreased risk of perforatio… Show more

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Cited by 4 publications
(1 citation statement)
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“…1,2 Theoretical investigations and in vitro studies demonstrated that pulsed laser systems with short absorption depths, such as the 308-nm xenon chloride laser, permitted controlled atheroablation. 3,4 Excimer laser-guided photoablation eventually received Food and Drug Administration (FDA) clearance as an endovascular debulking technology indicated for use as a treatment option See commentary page 676 for peripheral artery disease (PAD). One limitation of the technology, however, was the inability to create a lumen much larger than the nominal diameter of the ablation catheter.…”
Section: ¤ ¤mentioning
confidence: 99%
“…1,2 Theoretical investigations and in vitro studies demonstrated that pulsed laser systems with short absorption depths, such as the 308-nm xenon chloride laser, permitted controlled atheroablation. 3,4 Excimer laser-guided photoablation eventually received Food and Drug Administration (FDA) clearance as an endovascular debulking technology indicated for use as a treatment option See commentary page 676 for peripheral artery disease (PAD). One limitation of the technology, however, was the inability to create a lumen much larger than the nominal diameter of the ablation catheter.…”
Section: ¤ ¤mentioning
confidence: 99%