2016
DOI: 10.1002/jez.b.22687 View full text |Buy / Rent full text
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Abstract: Famous for its blind cavefish and Darwin's finches, Latin America is home to some of the richest biodiversity hotspots of our planet. The Latin American fauna and flora inspired and captivated naturalists from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, including such notable pioneers such as Fritz Müller, Florentino Ameghino, and Léon Croizat who made a significant contribution to the study of embryology and evolutionary thinking. But, what are the historical and present contributions of the Latin American scient… Show more

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“…Croizat's ideas would be part of a long line of evolutionary thought from continental Europe, that contrasts with the emphasis of natural selection of the Modern Synthesis (Heads, 2005a). A recent review of evolutionary developmental biology (evo-devo) in Latin America placed Croizat, the Prussian Fritz Müller and the Argentinean Florentino Ameghino as pioneers in this area (Marcellini et al, 2017). These authors acknowledged Croizat's (1964) Space, time, form for integrating explicitly evolutionary thought with developmental observations in plants and animals.…”
Section: Who Was Léon Croizat?mentioning
“…In Colombia the field of developmental biology and regeneration is a nascent field with few laboratories currently dedicated to the study of animal and plant development (Marcellini et al, 2017). In the laboratory of Genetics, Regeneration and Cancer (GRC) at Universidad de Antioquia, the first colony of A. mexicanum in Colombia has been established with the first animals coming from the Ambystoma Genetic Stock Center (AGSC) at the University of Kentucky in United States of America (Smith et al, 2005).…”
Section: Husbandry and Reproduction: The Colombian Experiencementioning
“…His main interest by then was to reconstruct a natural phylogenetic classification of the Crustacea, and he found this to be possible by exploring the progression of the larval stages, starting from the Nauplius. This view of bringing together Natural History and Evolution with and through Embryology (or what we would now call Developmental Biology) made Scott Gilbert refer to Fritz Müller as a “precursor of evolutionary developmental biology in the Americas” ( Gilbert, 2008 ), a view also held by Marcellini et al (2017) in their review on the past and present Evo-Devo research done in Latin America.…”
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