2021
DOI: 10.1111/plar.12422
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Abstract: In Britain, especially in the 2010s, neoliberal reform involved an extension of legal coercion into the domestic and community lives of marginalized citizens. On two postindustrial housing estates in Britain, working-class residents experience this "everyday authoritarianism" in areas that the liberal state typically constructs as private and purports to leave alone: the home and the intimate relations that frame it. Residents engage this legal coercion by adopting responses that range from defensive avoidance… Show more

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Cited by 2 publications
(1 citation statement)
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References 44 publications
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“…This suggests the need for a broad understanding of responses to repression, which is both "eventful" (Sewell, 1996) and structural. In other words, it is necessary to explore what happens after the deployment of force or soft coercion and also how "everyday authoritarianism" (Davey and Koch, 2021) teaches people to accommodate power throughout a lifetime.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…This suggests the need for a broad understanding of responses to repression, which is both "eventful" (Sewell, 1996) and structural. In other words, it is necessary to explore what happens after the deployment of force or soft coercion and also how "everyday authoritarianism" (Davey and Koch, 2021) teaches people to accommodate power throughout a lifetime.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%