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Cited by 54 publications
(24 citation statements)
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References 18 publications
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“…Published compression loads during industrial lifting tasks range from 3400 to 13,000 N (Karwowski, Caldwell, & Gaddie, 1994;Kumar, 1996;Norman et al, 1998). However, the estimates of spinal load during pushing ignore the influence of trunk muscle cocontraction, which can dramatically increase the spinal load (Granata & Marras, 1995b;Hughes et al, 1995). Published models (Gardner-Morse & Stokes, 1998) and empirical data (Cholewicki et al, 1997;Granata & Orishimo, 2001) suggest that antagonistic cocontraction is recruited to augment spinal stability.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…Published compression loads during industrial lifting tasks range from 3400 to 13,000 N (Karwowski, Caldwell, & Gaddie, 1994;Kumar, 1996;Norman et al, 1998). However, the estimates of spinal load during pushing ignore the influence of trunk muscle cocontraction, which can dramatically increase the spinal load (Granata & Marras, 1995b;Hughes et al, 1995). Published models (Gardner-Morse & Stokes, 1998) and empirical data (Cholewicki et al, 1997;Granata & Orishimo, 2001) suggest that antagonistic cocontraction is recruited to augment spinal stability.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Spinal load can be estimated from the vector sum of musclegenerated forces and external forces, F Ext .Musclegenerated forces can be estimated from the equilibrium trunk moment, M LS . This underestimates spinal load because muscle cocontraction and antagonistic recruitment patterns are ignored (Granata & Marras, 1995b;Hughes, Bean, & Chaffin, 1995). Future efforts must include muscle recruitment patterns in calculations of spinal load during pushing (Marras & Granata, 1997).…”
Section: Modelmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…There is evidence that the nervous system considers many objectives when selecting muscle activity patterns, including energy efficiency (Anderson and Pandy, 2001), joint stability (Stokes and Gardner-Morse, 2001;Brown and Potvin, 2005), joint loading (Seireg and Arvikar, 1973;Yettram and Jackman, 1982), joint discomfort (Marler et al, 2009), and muscle stress (Crowninshield and Brand, 1981;An et al, 1984;Hughes et al, 1995). These objectives often vary with properties of the task or environment (Milner and Cloutier, 1993;Burdet et al, 2001;Selen et al, 2006), and compete with one another for some motor tasks (Stokes and Gardner-Morse, 2001).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 97%
“…This approach ignores the actions of individual fascicles of the muscle groups, and also considers the action of each muscle only at the analyzed cross section, and not at other anatomical levels which it crosses. Furthermore, there is a wide reported range of directions for the muscle lines of action in the trunk (Han et al, 1992;Hughes et al, 1995;McGill, 1992McGill, , 1996 to which the calculated spinal and muscle forces are sensitive (Nussbaum et al, 1995).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%