2017
DOI: 10.1002/ca.22937
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Epithelial invasion after open globe injury

Abstract: Epithelial invasion after open globe injury is a rare complication. Wrong treatment (laser opening of the cyst) or no treatment can lead to painful blindness. Forty percent (25/62) of patients with block excision with epithelial downgrowth had a history of open globe injury. Four of them were female. Their mean age was 45 621 years. A tectonic keratoplasty with block excision was performed on 25 patients. Seven of them had simultaneously undergone cataract surgery. The mean extension of epithelial invasion was… Show more

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Cited by 9 publications
(6 citation statements)
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“…While the epithelial downgrowth presented here may be have been related to a time delay of almost one day until primary wound management, it might also have arisen from inadequate primary wound closure. Diffuse epithelial invasion is often diagnosed 6-11 months following trauma or initial surgery [2]. As in the case presented here, clinical symptoms may include evidence of a retrocorneal membrane; painful corneal decompensation; secondary glaucoma with angle closure; pupillary block; tractional retinal detachment; and ultimately loss of vision.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 84%
See 2 more Smart Citations
“…While the epithelial downgrowth presented here may be have been related to a time delay of almost one day until primary wound management, it might also have arisen from inadequate primary wound closure. Diffuse epithelial invasion is often diagnosed 6-11 months following trauma or initial surgery [2]. As in the case presented here, clinical symptoms may include evidence of a retrocorneal membrane; painful corneal decompensation; secondary glaucoma with angle closure; pupillary block; tractional retinal detachment; and ultimately loss of vision.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 84%
“…Diffuse epithelial invasion is often diagnosed 6 – 11 months following trauma or initial surgery 2 . As in the case presented here, clinical symptoms may include evidence of a retrocorneal membrane; painful corneal decompensation; secondary glaucoma with angle closure; pupillary block; tractional retinal detachment; and ultimately loss of vision.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…14 IOP elevation occurs when the epithelial growth blocks the trabecular meshwork and increases aqueous outflow resistance. 15,16 Epithelial pearls and cysts tend to be more benign in nature, whereas epithelial membranes proliferate aggressively and have the greatest potential for the development of secondary glaucoma. [15][16][17] Epithelial cell proliferation can lead to PAS.…”
Section: Mechanisms Specific To Penetrating Injurymentioning
confidence: 99%
“…15,16 Epithelial pearls and cysts tend to be more benign in nature, whereas epithelial membranes proliferate aggressively and have the greatest potential for the development of secondary glaucoma. [15][16][17] Epithelial cell proliferation can lead to PAS. Epithelial cells within the AC may also contain aberrant goblet cells, which can secrete mucin that can also block the trabecular meshwork.…”
Section: Mechanisms Specific To Penetrating Injurymentioning
confidence: 99%