2015
DOI: 10.18632/aging.100744
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Abstract: We previously reported the unusual case of a teenage girl stricken with multifocal developmental dysfunctions whose physical development was dramatically delayed resulting in her appearing to be a toddler or at best a preschooler, even unto the occasion of her death at the age of 20 years. Her life-long physician felt that the disorder was unique in the world and that future treatments for age-related diseases might emerge from its study. The objectives of our research were to determine if other such cases exi… Show more

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Cited by 37 publications
(35 citation statements)
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References 17 publications
(23 reference statements)
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“…Conversely, previous studies have suggested that strong genetic determinants of epigenetic aging exist, as illustrated by high heritability estimates of 0.43 and 0.65 although these studies could not account for environmental effects shared within families . Observed associations with more strongly genetically determined characteristics, such as age at menopause and obesity, or with certain genetic or neurodegenerative conditions may also point to a genetic component of age acceleration. Few studies have attempted to assess associations with common genetic variants …”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 81%
“…Conversely, previous studies have suggested that strong genetic determinants of epigenetic aging exist, as illustrated by high heritability estimates of 0.43 and 0.65 although these studies could not account for environmental effects shared within families . Observed associations with more strongly genetically determined characteristics, such as age at menopause and obesity, or with certain genetic or neurodegenerative conditions may also point to a genetic component of age acceleration. Few studies have attempted to assess associations with common genetic variants …”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 81%
“…The epigenetic clock has been shown to predict other aging-related outcomes, such as all-cause mortality [ 25 ], and cognitive and physical functions [ 26 ]. Further, it was used to show that 1) Down syndrome is associated with accelerated aging effects [ 27 ], 2) the cerebellum ages slowly [ 28 ], and 3) that the blood of subjects with a severe developmental disorder ages normally [ 29 ]. However, to the best of our knowledge, our study is the first to show its ability to predict future onset of lung cancer.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The second data set is from GSE40279, consisting of 656 blood samples from adults [34]. The Next data set is the GSE64495, also from blood samples of 113 individuals [35]. Then, the GSE60132, taken from peripheral blood samples of 192 individuals of Northern European ancestry [36].…”
Section: Real Data Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%