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Cited by 14 publications
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“…In addition, the percentage of wild-type mice exhibiting copulatory behaviors here is similar to that reported in a recent study also using C57Bl/6J mice (Bodo and Rissman, in press). Nonetheless, by testing the animals in their home cages, rather than in the presumably more stressful neutral arena (cf., Wee and Clemens, 1989), and/or by extending the length of each test (cf., Wersinger et al, 1997), it is possible that we would have observed higher response rates in both wild-type and Bax knockout animals.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…In addition, the percentage of wild-type mice exhibiting copulatory behaviors here is similar to that reported in a recent study also using C57Bl/6J mice (Bodo and Rissman, in press). Nonetheless, by testing the animals in their home cages, rather than in the presumably more stressful neutral arena (cf., Wee and Clemens, 1989), and/or by extending the length of each test (cf., Wersinger et al, 1997), it is possible that we would have observed higher response rates in both wild-type and Bax knockout animals.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Behavioral testing was performed during the dark phase of the light cycle under red illumination between 12:30 and 5:30 p.m. Behavioral scoring and testing procedures were as described previously (Clemens et al, 1988) except that the experimental males were tested in their home cages (Wee & Clemens, 1989). The data were recorded with a TRS-80 Model 4P computer with software described by Rakerd, Brigham, and Clemens (1985).…”
Section: Methodsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…This variability in steroid-independent male sexual behavior may be attributed to several environmental factors that have yet to be determined along with their interactions with the genetic factors that have been discussed. These include novel vs. home environment (see (Wee and Clemens, 1989), differential maternal care, and perinatal exposure to circulating gonadal steroids that have organizational effects on sexual differentiation, potentially due to intrauterine position. This last factor is especially intriguing given that several steroid-mediated cellular mechanisms that establish sex differences in synaptic patterning in the MPOA of the rat have been well characterized and correlated with male sexual behavior (Amateau and McCarthy, 2004; Schwarz et al, 2008).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%