2007
DOI: 10.1590/s1516-35982007001000015
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Abstract: Grasslands are being replaced by urbanization and more profitable agricultural activities around the world. Producers may be faced with land constraints and need to consider intensification of the remaining grasslands as a means of maintaining overall production on a decreasing land resource. However, intensification of the grazing system is usually associated with greater nutrient inputs, including those from commercial fertilizers and supplement fed to animals. Excessive loading of nutrients in intensive gra… Show more

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Cited by 36 publications
(23 citation statements)
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References 25 publications
(23 reference statements)
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“…Since there were no significant differences in either soil temperature and moisture or soil C or nutrient status between cattle-and sheep-grazed areas, we speculate that the increased GEP, R e , and R s in cattle-grazed areas may be driven by changes in the nutrient cycling resulting from the shift in herbivore type driven by (i) changes in the species composition and their decomposition rate and hence nutrient availability, and/or (ii) greater input of feces and trampling caused by cattle (Bardgett, 1998;Güsewell et al, 2003;Olofsson et al, 2004;Vendramini et al, 2007). Alternatively, the greater C turnover found in the cattlegrazed area might also be driven by the shifts in plant species composition resulting from the change from sheep to cattle grazing (Sebastià et al, 2008a).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 97%
“…Since there were no significant differences in either soil temperature and moisture or soil C or nutrient status between cattle-and sheep-grazed areas, we speculate that the increased GEP, R e , and R s in cattle-grazed areas may be driven by changes in the nutrient cycling resulting from the shift in herbivore type driven by (i) changes in the species composition and their decomposition rate and hence nutrient availability, and/or (ii) greater input of feces and trampling caused by cattle (Bardgett, 1998;Güsewell et al, 2003;Olofsson et al, 2004;Vendramini et al, 2007). Alternatively, the greater C turnover found in the cattlegrazed area might also be driven by the shifts in plant species composition resulting from the change from sheep to cattle grazing (Sebastià et al, 2008a).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 97%
“…intensificação dos sistemas de produção de pecuária bovina a pasto geralmente está associada com o aporte de nutrientes, incluindo fertilizantes químicos e suplementos para os animais (Vendramini et al 2007). Entre as diversas espécies de leguminosas forrageiras, espécies silvestres do gênero Arachis (Fabaceae), conhecidas popularmente por "amendoim forrageiro", vêm despertando interesse de muitos produtores e pesquisadores ao redor do mundo (Cook et al 2005;radoViCh et al 2009).…”
Section: _____________________________________unclassified
“…Partitioning of nutrients between feces and urine also reduces the uniformity of nutrient return through excreta. Cattle grazing a given patch consume forage containing different nutrients; however, the return does not occur uniformly at a given site (Vendramini et al, 2007).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%