2022
DOI: 10.1007/s00441-021-03567-9
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Abstract: Neural probes are sophisticated electrophysiological tools used for intra-cortical recording and stimulation. These microelectrode arrays, designed to penetrate and interface the brain from within, contribute at the forefront of basic and clinical neuroscience. However, one of the challenges and currently most significant limitations is their ‘seamless’ long-term integration into the surrounding brain tissue. Following implantation, which is typically accompanied by bleeding, the tissue responds with a scarrin… Show more

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Cited by 3 publications
(3 citation statements)
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“…[6,12,16,17,[37][38][39] Beyond fundamental biomaterials properties, biocompatibility of a bioelectronic implant is a matter of mechanical properties in the context of the intended in vivo location of the implant, which in turn is a combination of material mechanics and the geometry of the device itself. [40] A direct comparison to biocompatibility of devices within different tissues is therefore not possible, even if made from the same thin-film polyimide, stressing the importance of performing this evaluation specifically for the spinal cord. This point is further emphasized by a previous study, which showed that a polyimide implant inserted along the lumbosacral spinal cord in rats resulted in significant hind-limb motor deficits 6 weeks after surgery.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…[6,12,16,17,[37][38][39] Beyond fundamental biomaterials properties, biocompatibility of a bioelectronic implant is a matter of mechanical properties in the context of the intended in vivo location of the implant, which in turn is a combination of material mechanics and the geometry of the device itself. [40] A direct comparison to biocompatibility of devices within different tissues is therefore not possible, even if made from the same thin-film polyimide, stressing the importance of performing this evaluation specifically for the spinal cord. This point is further emphasized by a previous study, which showed that a polyimide implant inserted along the lumbosacral spinal cord in rats resulted in significant hind-limb motor deficits 6 weeks after surgery.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…One of the challenges and currently most significant limitations is their “seamless” long-term integration into the surrounding tissue. Otte et al ( 2022 ) in their review emphasize that, after implantation, which is typically accompanied by bleeding, the tissue responds with a scarring process. They summarize the considerable engineering progress that has minimized this reaction.…”
Section: A Brief Overview Of Articles In This Special Issuementioning
confidence: 99%
“…Silicon-based invasive neural interfaces have been widely used, and their performance has been proven in many studies [7][8][9][10]. However, longlasting integration of invasive neural interfaces with the neural tissue is the most challenging issue to be addressed at present [11]. Various efforts have been made to overcome the immune response induced by the implantation of neural interfaces, such as modifying the designs and materials of neural interfaces, modifying surface characteristics, and adding functions to them [12,13].…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%