2008
DOI: 10.1108/14608790200800013
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Abstract: Empowerment is a key value when working with clients subject to racist incidents in housing services. Casework practice is the process whereby, for example, housing officers, antisocial behaviour officers and neighbourhood wardens work with a tenant who has reported a racist incident to help resolve the complaint. This article focuses on the need for racist/hate incident caseworkers to be aware of the value of empowerment, and to be able to offer an empowering service when working directly with clients. The ar… Show more

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(2 citation statements)
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“…The persistent rates of racial harassment indicate the need for sustained attention to advance understanding both of the contributory factors and means of countering such harassment. Studies of racial harassment which reveal that most incidents occur near victims’ homes (Chahal, 2007; Clark and Leven, 2000) and housing studies of ethnic minority households which reveal that fear of, and actual experience of, the phenomenon is common (Netto et al , 2011; Phillips, 2006) combine to highlight the important role played by social landlords in addressing racial harassment. Despite this, few academic studies have focused on the experiences of racist victimisation within and around places of residence, the challenges faced by housing organisations in responding to racial harassment and the potential for intervention.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…The persistent rates of racial harassment indicate the need for sustained attention to advance understanding both of the contributory factors and means of countering such harassment. Studies of racial harassment which reveal that most incidents occur near victims’ homes (Chahal, 2007; Clark and Leven, 2000) and housing studies of ethnic minority households which reveal that fear of, and actual experience of, the phenomenon is common (Netto et al , 2011; Phillips, 2006) combine to highlight the important role played by social landlords in addressing racial harassment. Despite this, few academic studies have focused on the experiences of racist victimisation within and around places of residence, the challenges faced by housing organisations in responding to racial harassment and the potential for intervention.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…However, a major shortcoming of this definition is its failure to recognise that the vast majority of racial incidents are perpetrated by individuals from the majority White population against ethnic minorities (Chahal, 2007). This has led analysts to argue that this pattern of racist victimisation needs to be understood in the context of unequal power relations between majority and minority ethnic populations (Chahal, 1999; Hesse et al , 1992).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%