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Cited by 367 publications
(284 citation statements)
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“…The extension of the fibrils with increasing strain has previously been ascribed largely to the sliding of the tropocollagen within the fibrils, resulting in an increase in the gap region, rather than to the extension of the tropocollagen molecules that constitute the fibrils. 30 We note that the stress-strain curve does not show a marked foot region, it does not exhibit a low Young's modulus at low strain, which suggests that an entropic straightening of the fibrils may not be a major factor in the strain of the material.…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 74%
“…The extension of the fibrils with increasing strain has previously been ascribed largely to the sliding of the tropocollagen within the fibrils, resulting in an increase in the gap region, rather than to the extension of the tropocollagen molecules that constitute the fibrils. 30 We note that the stress-strain curve does not show a marked foot region, it does not exhibit a low Young's modulus at low strain, which suggests that an entropic straightening of the fibrils may not be a major factor in the strain of the material.…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 74%
“…The ratio of intensities of the 2 nd and 3 rd order reflections was analyzed to assess changes in length of the overlap region and gap region during the ramp-to-failure experiments [36,39]. The control fibrils showed three distinct loading mechanism at the sub-fibrillar scale (Fig.…”
Section: Completely Different Loading Mechanisms At the Sub-fibrillarmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…At strains beyond 2% strain, the low modulus of the toe region gives rise to the nonlinear heel region, during which reorientation and un-crimping of the collagen fibrils and stretching of the triple helix, the non-helical ends and the cross-links takes place [269,271,283]. When collagen is stretched beyond the heel region, no further extension is possible [259,270,284,285], the wavy pattern is now straightened and cross-links and fibrils start breaking [261]. To-date, advances in chemistry and engineering have made available numerous polymers, cross-linking systems and scaffold fabrication technologies that closely imitate the biomechanical properties of native tendons (Table 3).…”
Section: Mechanical Properties Of Tendon Tissuementioning
confidence: 99%