2017 IEEE Transportation Electrification Conference and Expo, Asia-Pacific (ITEC Asia-Pacific) 2017
DOI: 10.1109/itec-ap.2017.8080780
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Cited by 8 publications
(4 citation statements)
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References 5 publications
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“…In conclusion, the OC system should be preferred for long‐haul transportation. However, as Márquez‐Fernández, Gabriel, Lars, and Mats () highlight, it might be necessary to share infrastructure. They conclude that the WPT system should be preferred if mixed traffic is considered.…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…In conclusion, the OC system should be preferred for long‐haul transportation. However, as Márquez‐Fernández, Gabriel, Lars, and Mats () highlight, it might be necessary to share infrastructure. They conclude that the WPT system should be preferred if mixed traffic is considered.…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Hence, an ERS that allows for passenger cars to charge could result in significant societal benefits and reduces costs compared to a system that only relies on stationary charging. 20 , 22 Previous studies have shown significant GHG emission abatement potentials in enabling a larger part of the passenger car fleet to electrify through access to an ERS by estimating impacts on tailpipe emissions in Sweden and Norway, 23 on tailpipe and fuel cycle emissions in the U.S. 15 and on the life cycle, including tailpipe, infrastructure, battery manufacturing, and fuel cycle, in Washtenaw County in Michigan, U.S. 24 While some studies have included a broad range of aspects of how an ERS could impact GHG emissions, none of the previous studies consider potential emission abatement measures in vehicle manufacturing and road construction supply chains.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Shoman et al analyze real-world driving data and suggest that ERS could reduce battery sizes of BEVs by up to 75% and reduce the need for stationary charging, if not eliminating it at all for 30–70% of drivers depending on the ERS transfer power. Hence, an ERS that allows for passenger cars to charge could result in significant societal benefits and reduces costs compared to a system that only relies on stationary charging. , Previous studies have shown significant GHG emission abatement potentials in enabling a larger part of the passenger car fleet to electrify through access to an ERS by estimating impacts on tailpipe emissions in Sweden and Norway, on tailpipe and fuel cycle emissions in the U.S . and on the life cycle, including tailpipe, infrastructure, battery manufacturing, and fuel cycle, in Washtenaw County in Michigan, U.S .…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The authors of [9] assessed the demand and costs for Great Britain electrification due to dynamic inductive charging for both LDVs and HDV, analyzing different kinds of transport networks, including rural areas and motorways. In [10], the authors assessed the cost-effectiveness of the implementation of plug-in and dynamic technologies (catenary and inductive) depending on the traffic flow. In [11], the authors compared the energy and the power demand of plug-in, dynamic, hydrogen, and power-to-fuel electrification strategies for a real case study (the E39 highway in Western Norway).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%