1999
DOI: 10.1001/archderm.135.5.608
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Effects on Human Epidermis of Chronic Suberythemal Exposure to Pure Infrared Radiation

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Cited by 9 publications
(3 citation statements)
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“…Whereas these two groups of studies provide no information concerning the heating effects of IR, they are nevertheless useful in distinguishing the effects of IR from secondary heating‐related phenomena. In a further group of eight studies, temperature increases of up to 42°C were found (14,42,45,46,80–85).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 98%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…Whereas these two groups of studies provide no information concerning the heating effects of IR, they are nevertheless useful in distinguishing the effects of IR from secondary heating‐related phenomena. In a further group of eight studies, temperature increases of up to 42°C were found (14,42,45,46,80–85).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 98%
“…Even single overexposures to IR radiation are capable of inducing heat pain and can lead to acute damage in the form of skin burns, urticaria thermalis or collapse of the circulatory system. In cases in which excessively frequent repeated exposures have been applied, chronic damage, such as Erythema ab igne and squamous cell carcinoma can result (11–21), even when tissue is exposed to heating below the limits related to heat pain or acute heat damage.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Figure compares the IR‐A irradiances used by various investigators in their laboratory studies on bioeffects attributed to infrared, with IR‐A irradiances from mid‐latitude summer sunlight around the middle of the day . Note that irradiance is plotted on a logarithmic scale because of the huge difference between the levels we are exposed to in sunlight and what investigators have used in the laboratory.…”
Section: Risk Management Approach To Claims About Sunscreensmentioning
confidence: 99%