2005
DOI: 10.1590/s1519-69842005000100008
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Abstract: Decomposition of aquatic plants is influenced by several biotic and abiotic factors. Among them, temperature plays an important role. Despite the increasing number of studies describing the effects of temperature on the decomposition of aquatic macrophytes, little attention has been given to the decay of submerged macrophytes. In this paper, we assessed the effect of temperature on weight loss and chemical composition of detritus of the submerged aquatic macrophyte Egeria najas Planchon (Hydrocharitaceae). Fre… Show more

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Cited by 33 publications
(37 citation statements)
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References 22 publications
(37 reference statements)
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“…After an initial decrease in pH mainly owing to a high CO 2 formation from LPOC oxidation, upon decomposition the pH increased probably due to the release of anions and other processes such as hydration of ammonia. This process was also reported in the decomposition of Egeria najas (Carvalho et al, 2005) and for T. domingensis (Howard-Williams, C. and Howard-Williams, W.). McKinley and Vestal (1982) reported that in microcosm experiment with Carex litter, reductions below pH 5.0 of lake water increased dramatically the effect on the microbial colonization and decomposition of Carex litter.…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
confidence: 71%
“…After an initial decrease in pH mainly owing to a high CO 2 formation from LPOC oxidation, upon decomposition the pH increased probably due to the release of anions and other processes such as hydration of ammonia. This process was also reported in the decomposition of Egeria najas (Carvalho et al, 2005) and for T. domingensis (Howard-Williams, C. and Howard-Williams, W.). McKinley and Vestal (1982) reported that in microcosm experiment with Carex litter, reductions below pH 5.0 of lake water increased dramatically the effect on the microbial colonization and decomposition of Carex litter.…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
confidence: 71%
“…Essa alta perda de biomassa, nas primeiras 24 horas, possivelmente está relacionada com a temperatura da água. A temperatura da água afeta significativamente as taxas de decomposição de macrófitas (CARPENTER; ADAMS, 1979;CARVALHO et al, 2005). Carvalho et al (2005) destacaram, em estudo sobre o efeito da temperatura sobre decomposição de macrófitas, que temperaturas mais elevadas aumentam a atividade microbiana, assim como aumenta o consumo de oxigênio dissolvido na água.…”
Section: Resultados E Discussõesunclassified
“…A temperatura da água afeta significativamente as taxas de decomposição de macrófitas (CARPENTER; ADAMS, 1979;CARVALHO et al, 2005). Carvalho et al (2005) destacaram, em estudo sobre o efeito da temperatura sobre decomposição de macrófitas, que temperaturas mais elevadas aumentam a atividade microbiana, assim como aumenta o consumo de oxigênio dissolvido na água. Quando comparamos a perda de biomassa na lagoa Paraíso com outros trabalhos que avaliaram o processo de decomposição da mesma espécie de planta (STRIPARI; HENRY, 2002; PAGIORO; THOMAZ, 1998), foi observado que as temperaturas de superfície da água foram sempre maiores na lagoa Paraíso, Amazonas, que em relação aos estudos desses autores.…”
Section: Resultados E Discussõesunclassified
“…Since aquatic plants generally begin to decompose at the senescence stage, part of the labile compounds may have been lost even before incubation in water (Pagioro and Thomaz 2006). Additionally, factors like decreasing water temperature through the experiment, occasional inhibition of microorganism growth by leachate, predominance of an oligotrophic environment and low abrasion due to the environment lentic regime may have contributed to a low decomposition rate of E. azurea (Battle and Mihuc 2000;Grattan and Suberkropp 2001;Sangiorgio et al 2004;Carvalho et al 2005;Sangiorgio et al 2008;Song . 2013).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%