2017
DOI: 10.1590/s1806-92902017000600005
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Abstract: This study was performed to evaluate the effects of the association of different digestible arginine and phytogenic additive dietary levels on performance and health status of brown-egg layers. In this study, a total of 504 33-week-old Hisex Brown layers were distributed into a completely randomized experimental design to a 4 × 3 factorial arrangement (dietary digestible arginine levels: 880, 968, 1056, or 1144 mg/kg of feed × phytogenic additive levels: 0, 100, and 200 mg/kg of feed) with six replicate cages … Show more

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Cited by 2 publications
(44 citation statements)
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References 34 publications
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“…Thus, phytogenic antioxidants provide protection against reactive oxygen species in animals that consume feed supplemented with these substances, as well as in the food products obtained from these animals, and humans, who consume these food products, only when incorporated in feed at an optimum level. Indeed, Fascina et al (2017) reported significantly decreased blood and intestinal MDA levels in laying hens fed a ration supplemented with a phytogenic antioxidant (20% cinnamon).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Phenyl terpenes, such as cinnamaldehyde, thymol, menthol, and vanillin, show a strong antioxidant effect against lipid oxidation (Bizzo et al, 2009;Gouda et al, 2017). It has been reported that, in chickens fed rations supplemented with antioxidant herbal compounds, blood and intestinal malondialdehyde (MDA) levels decrease, and both immunity and performance status improve (Fascina et al, 2017). Haripriya and Vijayalakshmi (2014) reported that dietary cinnamaldehyde supplementation activates the anti-lipidemic defence mechanism and produces an antihypercholesterolaemic effect, which prevents the development of cardiovascular disease.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Some phytogenics supplemented in laying hen diets include some plant extracts: Chinese herbal extracts -Lonicera confuse and Astragali Radix extracts (114), ginger extract (115), and the combination of probiotics and plant extracts (116), have been reported to improved albumen quality. Other studies have also reported that phytogenics in powdery form by combination of various phytogenic feed additives (73,117,118), alfalfa meal (70), fruit -Ligustrum lucidum (119) enhanced albumen quality. However, a higher level of mulberry leaf inclusion reduced egg weight and increased HU but had no effect on albumen height (120).…”
Section: Phytobioticsmentioning
confidence: 96%
“…Recent reports showed that diet supplementation such as phytogenic feed additive (67) and natural astaxanthin (68) improved intestine morphology, small organic peptide (18) and organic selenium (69) enhanced intestinal health while alfalfa meal (70) enhanced beneficial gut microbial population. Diets such as tea polyphenols at 600 mg/kg (71) and 400 mg/kg (72), and phytogenic extracts (73) have been found to enhance immune function capacity, while magnolol enhanced the antioxidant capacity of the ovary (74). In addition, prebiotics (75,76) improved serum antioxidant capacity, and probiotics exerted positive effect on beneficial gut microbes (77) and nutrient utilization (78).…”
Section: Factors Affecting Albumen Quality Animal Healthmentioning
confidence: 99%
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