1994
DOI: 10.1590/s0074-02761994000400022
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Abstract: The effect of temperature (20 degrees-35 degrees C) on different stages of Romanomermis iyengari was studied. In embryonic development, the single-cell stage eggs developed into mature eggs in 4.5-6.5 days at 25-35 degrees C but, required 9.5 days at 20 degrees C. Complete hatching occurred in 7 and 9 days after egg-laying at 35 and 30 degrees C, respectively. At 25 and 20 degrees C, 85-96% of the eggs did not hatch even by 30th day. Loss of infectivity and death of the preparasites occurred faster at higher t… Show more

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Cited by 8 publications
(3 citation statements)
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“…The duration of the parasitic phase of R. iyengari has been reported to be temperature dependent (Paily & Balaraman, 1994) and the present study showed that it did not differ among host mosquito species. Premature death of hosts due to parasitism was not noticed in any of the species tested, including Ma .…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
confidence: 61%
“…The duration of the parasitic phase of R. iyengari has been reported to be temperature dependent (Paily & Balaraman, 1994) and the present study showed that it did not differ among host mosquito species. Premature death of hosts due to parasitism was not noticed in any of the species tested, including Ma .…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
confidence: 61%
“…gambiae, a major malaria vector in West Africa. The physicochemical data of water in treated sites were in the range considered to be optimal for allowing R. iyengari to reproduce and to continue parasitizing larval mosquitoes over a long period [12, 26, 29–31]. Perez-Pacheco et al [20] indicated that a number of topographical and hydrological factors can play role in the effectiveness of R. iyengari against malaria vectors.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Nymphs and females of thrips are susceptible to this nematode, and infected females have fewer developing eggs in the ovaries , 1964, Paily andJayachandran, 1987;Paily et al, 1991Achutan, 1988;Paily and Balaraman, 1990 (Reddy et al, 1982;Varatharajan, 1985). The life cycle, nature of parasitism, occurrence and distribution of H. aptini indicate that it is a potential biocontrol agent under natural conditions (Rukminidevi and Rao, 1982).…”
Section: Allantonematid Nematodesmentioning
confidence: 99%