2011
DOI: 10.1111/j.1369-1600.2010.00289.x
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Abstract: ABSTRACTa db_289 539..546In rodents, a conditioned place preference (CPP) can be induced by morphine. In the current study, we designed a biased place conditioning paradigm to test the rewarding effects of morphine in freely moving rhesus monkeys. Five monkeys were first placed in three serial rooms with the doors open between them for three days. After this habituation period, during which baseline preference for each of the two end rooms was measured, CPP conditioning occurred when the monkeys were injected … Show more

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Cited by 14 publications
(12 citation statements)
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References 10 publications
(11 reference statements)
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“…Time spent in the cocaine-paired compartment was still significantly elevated 15 days after conditioning (trial T3) with the 7 mg/kg dose, whereas pre-CPP rates were seen when the lower 3 mg/kg dose was used. Although rodents demonstrate long-lasting drug-induced CPP (reviewed in Tzschentke, 2007), in NHPs this has only been reported so far for morphine (Wang et al, 2012) and highly-palatable foods (Duarte et al, 2014). Furthermore, there was no relationship between the marmosets' cocaine-induced CPP and hypervigilance, similar to reports in rodents (Brabant et al, 2005;Orsini et al, 2005;Seymour and Wagner, 2008).…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
confidence: 56%
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“…Time spent in the cocaine-paired compartment was still significantly elevated 15 days after conditioning (trial T3) with the 7 mg/kg dose, whereas pre-CPP rates were seen when the lower 3 mg/kg dose was used. Although rodents demonstrate long-lasting drug-induced CPP (reviewed in Tzschentke, 2007), in NHPs this has only been reported so far for morphine (Wang et al, 2012) and highly-palatable foods (Duarte et al, 2014). Furthermore, there was no relationship between the marmosets' cocaine-induced CPP and hypervigilance, similar to reports in rodents (Brabant et al, 2005;Orsini et al, 2005;Seymour and Wagner, 2008).…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
confidence: 56%
“…In fact, it has become an increasingly prevalent procedure to evaluate aspects of addiction-like behaviors (Tzschentke, 2007). Although commonly reported in rodents, the CPP paradigm has only recently been demonstrated in NHPs using both drug- Foltin and Evans, 2001;Wang et al, 2012) and food-related stimuli (Duarte et al, 2014;Foltin and Evans, 2002;Monclaro et al, 2014;Valentinuzzi et al, 2008). As the outcome in rodents can be significantly influenced by several factors, including drug dose, injection-conditioning interval, duration of the conditionings and number of drug-pairings (reviewed in Tzschentke, 2007), a more detailed evaluation in NHPs is warranted.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…However, our present results in the CPP/CPA paradigm displayed tree shrews needed 10 training days, which is similar to rodents (Shen et al, 2012; Xu et al, 2012). We speculated that the competent cognitive abilities of tree shrews might be reflected in a longer retention time of addiction memory, just like the non-human primates, which can maintain this preference for at least 15.3 ± 1.7 months (Wang et al, 2012). In addition, the longevity of the tree shrew (about 5–7 years) is an important consideration, allowing for long-term studies to be conducted.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Interestingly, the effect persisted for at least 15 days, an aspect that to date has only been consistently demonstrated for drug-related rewards. Considering that the CPP paradigm in now being established in non-human primates (Barros et al, 2013;Monclaro et al, 2014;Valentinuzzi et al, 2008;Wang et al, 2012) and humans (Childs and de Wit, 2009), future studies comparing different food items and evaluating possible long-term effects may play a significant role in elucidating the neural mechanisms underlying the overconsumption of highly palatable foods items (like chocolate).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…This effect is an associatively learned preference for certain locations that is acquired in response to experiencing a rewarding agent at that same location Tzschentke, 2007). The CPP paradigm has only recently been demonstrated in non-human primates using both drug- (Barros et al, 2013;Wang et al, 2012) and food-related stimuli (Monclaro et al, 2014;Valentinuzzi et al, 2008). However, the persistence of a food-induced CPP response has not been assessed, regardless of the species and food type.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%