2017
DOI: 10.23855/preslia.2017.063
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Abstract: Electronic Appendix 1.-List of examined herbarium specimens and published references related to the occurrence and distribution of Solenopsora candicans (Dicks.) J. Steiner and S. cesatii (A. Massal.) Zahlbr. Symbol * indicates the entries which were used for identification of niche overlap of the study species (see Material and method-Species records).

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Cited by 11 publications
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“…This has been achieved in different ways. Most studies have used a threshold of model probability or likelihood of occurrence in designating a cut-off for climatically suitable sites, thus calculating a shifted distribution or extent of these locations between the baseline and climate change scenarios [86][87][88][89][90][91][92]. A smaller number of studies have used a net difference of probability/likelihood values to calculate a shift in climatic suitability for a given region [93][94][95].…”
Section: Challenge 2: Projection To Climate Change Scenariosmentioning
confidence: 99%
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“…This has been achieved in different ways. Most studies have used a threshold of model probability or likelihood of occurrence in designating a cut-off for climatically suitable sites, thus calculating a shifted distribution or extent of these locations between the baseline and climate change scenarios [86][87][88][89][90][91][92]. A smaller number of studies have used a net difference of probability/likelihood values to calculate a shift in climatic suitability for a given region [93][94][95].…”
Section: Challenge 2: Projection To Climate Change Scenariosmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…For example, there is an estimated loss of suitable climate space > 75% for Lobaria species in Italy by the 2080s [88] and for Vulpicida pinastri in Britain by the 2050s [91], and by the 2070s an 80-100% loss for Solonopsora spp. in the Carpathians [86] with > 90% loss of suitable climate space for high-elevation lichens endemic to the Appalachians [87]. Analysis for lichen biogeographic groups can indicate the contrast between species with losses and gains of bioclimatic space [96], with a loss of suitable climate space for c. 75% of species modelled for the Iberian Peninsula by the 2080s [90].…”
Section: Challenge 2: Projection To Climate Change Scenariosmentioning
confidence: 99%
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“…Of the more than 70 genera in the largest macrolichen clade (Parmeliaceae, Lecanoromycetes, Ascomycota), approximately 28% are cosmopolitan, 37% occur in North America, and 7% occur only in North America (Elix, 1993). We assumed that continental (rather than global) sampling would adequately sample most climatic niches because intercontinental lichen species tend to occur within latitudinal bands exhibiting similar climates (Feuerer & Hawksworth, 2007), and occupy a defined set of climatic habitats regardless of geography (Fačkovcová, Senko, Svitok, & Guttová, 2017).…”
Section: Niche Coverage: Truncated Versus Extended Climate Nichesmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The evolutionary direction, ecological habits, and geographical distribution of species are affected, constrained, and driven by the changing climate and human activities, which in turn affects ecosystem structure and biodiversity, except for human influence [1][2][3]. Periodic reciprocating oscillations, such as the glacial and interglacial periods and other sudden events in geological history, have led to regional differences in biodiversity; the last interglacial (LIG, 120-140 ka) is most closely related to modern times [4]. In the last glacial maximum (LGM, 22 ka), due to the rapid deterioration of the climate, several species have become extinct, and the distribution of most surviving species has shrunk sharply.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%