1971
DOI: 10.1001/archderm.103.2.148
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Ecological effects of oral antibiotics on the microflora of human skin

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Cited by 31 publications
(21 citation statements)
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“…While the effects of longterm antibiotic use on cutaneous microbial environments in patients with acne have been well studied, the effects of this therapy on noncutaneous surfaces, such as the oropharynx, which could be a source of systemic illness, have not. [3][4][5][6][7][8][9] Upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs), such as pharyngitis, are extraordinarily common acute medical problems, primarily of viral origin. In general, about 10% of URTIs are likely due to a bacterial source.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…While the effects of longterm antibiotic use on cutaneous microbial environments in patients with acne have been well studied, the effects of this therapy on noncutaneous surfaces, such as the oropharynx, which could be a source of systemic illness, have not. [3][4][5][6][7][8][9] Upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs), such as pharyngitis, are extraordinarily common acute medical problems, primarily of viral origin. In general, about 10% of URTIs are likely due to a bacterial source.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…2,3 Tetracyclines and erythromycin are 2 antibiotics commonly used in dermatological practice for the long-term treatment of acne vulgaris. 1 Studies have shown that Propionibacterium acnes and coagulase-negative staphylococci quickly develop resistance to these antibiotics, 4,5 which may result in therapeutic failure and the propagation of resistance to bacteria in the skin 6 and gastrointestinal flora of close contacts. 7 While the effects of longterm antibiotic use on cutaneous microbial environments in this patient population have been well studied, the effects on noncutaneous surfaces such as the oropharynx (which could be a source of systemic illness) have not.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…While tetracycline-resistant cutaneous flora has been a well-documented consequence of antibiotic therapy for acne, [4][5][6] increased colonization of tetracycline-resistant bacteria in the oropharynx has never been consistently associated with pathogenic disease. Our study is limited in that we only investigated bacterial resistance to tetracycline antibiotics.…”
Section: Commentmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Hydrolysis of sebum triglycerides by bacterial lipases, in particular those of propionibacteria (13,20), and the subsequent release of irritating free fatty acids in the pilosebaceous follicles has been proposed as a major factor in the formation of lesions in acne vulgaris (22). Improvement in acne is often achieved by long-term administration of broad-spectrum antibiotics which are thought to decrease the density of propionibacteria (1,12,14) and hence reduce the free fatty acids in the sebum (7, 18). At present, there are few reports describing the effects of antibiotics on propionibacteria in vitro, those that do exist being mainly concerned with the evaluation of antimicrobial susceptibility (9,19).…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Improvement in acne is often achieved by long-term administration of broad-spectrum antibiotics which are thought to decrease the density of propionibacteria (1, 12,14) and hence reduce the free fatty acids in the sebum (7,18). At present, there are few reports describing the effects of antibiotics on propionibacteria in vitro, those that do exist being mainly concerned with the evaluation of antimicrobial susceptibility (9,19).…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%