1997
DOI: 10.1162/002081897550429
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Abstract: International relations scholars have tended to focus on realism's common features rather than exploring potential differences. Realists do share certain assumptions and are often treated as a group, but such a broad grouping obscures systematic divisions within realist theory. Recently, some analysts have argued that it is necessary to differentiate within realism. This article builds on this line of argument. The potential, and need, to divide realism on the basis of divergent assumptions has so far been ove… Show more

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Cited by 222 publications
(101 citation statements)
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References 10 publications
(11 reference statements)
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“…It also depends on their ability to balance, or "trade-off" between achieving nationalist and pragmatic policy-objectives. 28 Ideally, the Japanese government/state-elites would like to embrace the domestic nationalist agenda, while simultaneously seeking to realise Japan's broader national 28 For works with similar assumptions from which this thesis draws its ideas, see Downs and Saunders (1998/9), Bong (2002), Brooks (1997), and Fearon (1994). For a good work on "trade-off", see Morrow (1993).…”
Section: The Research Problem and Objectivesmentioning
confidence: 99%
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“…It also depends on their ability to balance, or "trade-off" between achieving nationalist and pragmatic policy-objectives. 28 Ideally, the Japanese government/state-elites would like to embrace the domestic nationalist agenda, while simultaneously seeking to realise Japan's broader national 28 For works with similar assumptions from which this thesis draws its ideas, see Downs and Saunders (1998/9), Bong (2002), Brooks (1997), and Fearon (1994). For a good work on "trade-off", see Morrow (1993).…”
Section: The Research Problem and Objectivesmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…For a seminal work on the "security dilemma" concept, see Jervis (1978). 18 This term is, commonly used with other equivalent expressions like "straightjacket" in IR theoretical works, to describe the rigid underpinnings of conventional/neo-realism (see Brooks 1997;Guzzini 2004:535). 19 This term is taken from Yahuda (2006).…”
Section: Mainstream Ir Theories' "Analytical Myopia" On Nationalismmentioning
confidence: 99%
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“…Neorealists assume that countries try to maximize their interests through extended influence and relative gains, whereas interactions with other countries are characterized by a mutual lack of confidence and fear of cheating (Brooks 1997;Grieco 1988). Guided by these assumptions, we can explore whether the dominant coalition of states has indeed used its power to maximize its interests in the affected regimes-and whether lack of confidence has led them to seek solutions in alternative arenas-thereby leading to the observed consequences on the output level.…”
Section: Regime Conflicts and Global Environmental Governance 213mentioning
confidence: 99%
“…In 1979 Kenneth Waltz significantly altered the realist perspective by suggesting that it is actually the anarchic nature of the system that is responsible for compelling states to act in an aggressive manner. While a general consensus as to the validity of Waltz' "structural" perspective has emerged, further disagreements have arisen among realists, concerning the actual motive for conflictual behavior at the unit (state) level (Brooks 1997;Snyder 2002;Montgomery 2006). So called "defensive realists," such as Waltz himself, have argued that states are not always seeking power for its own sake, rather they often seek only security.…”
Section: Is China a Threat?-the Theoretical Debatementioning
confidence: 99%