2020
DOI: 10.1590/0037-8682-0155-2020
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Driving forces for COVID-19 clinical trials using chloroquine: the need to choose the right research questions and outcomes

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Cited by 21 publications
(17 citation statements)
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References 11 publications
(10 reference statements)
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“…The best approach to introduce rapid therapy is to test drugs that are already available on the market, as these have a safety profile previously widely studied (Dorward and Gbinigie 2020;Singh et al 2020). Nevertheless, the pathophysiological characteristics of COVID-19 should be taken into consideration, since drugs, as an example of hydroxychloroquine and chloroquine, present a predisposition to the development of cardiotoxicity in patients with COVID-19 (Monteiro et al 2020;Driggin et al 2020;Mehra et al 2020).…”
Section: Nanotechnology For the Prevention And Treatment Of Covid-19mentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The best approach to introduce rapid therapy is to test drugs that are already available on the market, as these have a safety profile previously widely studied (Dorward and Gbinigie 2020;Singh et al 2020). Nevertheless, the pathophysiological characteristics of COVID-19 should be taken into consideration, since drugs, as an example of hydroxychloroquine and chloroquine, present a predisposition to the development of cardiotoxicity in patients with COVID-19 (Monteiro et al 2020;Driggin et al 2020;Mehra et al 2020).…”
Section: Nanotechnology For the Prevention And Treatment Of Covid-19mentioning
confidence: 99%
“…In a randomized double-masked, phase IIb clinical trial (ChlorCovid-19 Study), with 81 adults who were hospitalized with SARS-CoV-2, preliminary findings suggest that the highest dose of chloroquine (600 mg, 2x/day, for 10 days, total dose of 12 g) should not be recommended for critically ill patients with COVID-19 due to security risk. These findings prematurely interrupted the recruitment of patients for this study (17,82,83).…”
Section: Chloroquine and Hydroxychloroquinementioning
confidence: 99%
“…antibody, molecular markers and gene based therapies) 17 . There is a recurring argument emphasizing the HCQ perceived safety and low cost [18][19][20] . Nevertheless, when a treatment is unequivocally effective, we do use it despite adverse effects and despite the associated cost.…”
Section: The Fragile Biological Plausibilitymentioning
confidence: 99%