2017
DOI: 10.1037/gpr0000123 View full text |Buy / Rent full text
|
|

Abstract: Citation: Rubin, M. (2017). Do p values lose their meaning in exploratory analyses? It depends how you define the familywise error rate. Review of General Psychology, 21, 269-275. doi: 10.1037/gpr0000123 Abstract Several researchers have recently argued that p values lose their meaning in exploratory analyses due to an unknown inflation of the alpha level (e.g., Nosek & Lakens, 2014;Wagenmakers, 2016). For this argument to be tenable, the familywise error rate must be defined in relation to the number of hy… Show more

Help me understand this report
View preprint versions

Search citation statements

Order By: Relevance
Select...
5
1
84
0

Year Published

2017
2017
2017
2017

Publication Types

Select...
1

Relationship

1
0

Authors

Journals

1
84
0
Order By: Relevance
“…In this case, the familywise error rate refers to the probability of making a Type I error when testing a joint null hypothesis that any of the hypothesised effects is zero. The theoretical implications of rejecting this joint null hypothesis are unclear when its constituent individual hypotheses are derived from different theories (Rubin, 2017). It is more meaningful to test a joint hypothesis when its constituent hypotheses are derived from the same theory because, in this case, its rejection can be taken as providing support for the theory (Hewes, 2003).…”
Section: Adjusting the Alpha Levelmentioning
See 4 more Smart Citations
Create an account to read the remaining citation statements from this report. You will also get access to:
  • Search over 1.2b+ citation statments to see what is being said about any topic in the research literature
  • Advanced Search to find publications that support or contrast your research
  • Citation reports and visualizations to easily see what publications are saying about each other
  • Browser extension to see Smart Citations wherever you read research
  • Dashboards to evaluate and keep track of groups of publications
  • Alerts to stay on top of citations as they happen
  • Automated reference checks to make sure you are citing reliable research in your manuscripts
  • 7 day free preview of our premium features.

Trusted by researchers and organizations around the world

Over 130,000 students researchers, and industry experts at use scite

See what students are saying

rupbmjkragerfmgwileyiopcupepmcmbcthiemesagefrontiersapsiucrarxivemeralduhksmucshluniversity-of-gavle
“…In this case, the familywise error rate refers to the probability of making a Type I error when testing a joint null hypothesis that any of the hypothesised effects is zero. The theoretical implications of rejecting this joint null hypothesis are unclear when its constituent individual hypotheses are derived from different theories (Rubin, 2017). It is more meaningful to test a joint hypothesis when its constituent hypotheses are derived from the same theory because, in this case, its rejection can be taken as providing support for the theory (Hewes, 2003).…”
Section: Adjusting the Alpha Levelmentioning
“…It is more meaningful to test a joint hypothesis when its constituent hypotheses are derived from the same theory because, in this case, its rejection can be taken as providing support for the theory (Hewes, 2003). However, even under these circumstances, it is only necessary to adjust the alpha level for each constituent hypothesis if a significant result (i.e., p < αadjusted) for any one of the constituent hypotheses is regarded as being sufficient to reject the joint null hypothesis as a whole (Matsunaga, 2007;Rubin, 2017;Weber, 2007).…”
Section: Adjusting the Alpha Levelmentioning
See 3 more Smart Citations