2006
DOI: 10.1177/0164027505285845
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Abstract: Although the relationship between educational attainment and health is well established, there is disagreement about how this relationship changes across the life course. Some studies have shown that educational health disparities widen in middle age and then start to abate in old age, whereas others have shown that health disparities continue to widen in old age. The author used the 1992-2002 Health and Retirement Study to shed new light on this old debate. Because findings of declining health inequalities in… Show more

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Cited by 120 publications
(33 citation statements)
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References 23 publications
(36 reference statements)
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“…If it is an age effect, our findings could indicate that material- and knowledge-related resources have a greater impact on subjective oral health in early and mid-adulthood than later in life. This stronger relationship between SEP and subjective oral health at younger ages could be explained by the “age-as-leveler” hypothesis that states that health inequalities widen in early to mid-adulthood and tend to decrease later in life [48]. One reason to explain this change is that people in higher SEP levels can only delay health decline for a specific period in their lives, and therefore, in later life they “catch up” those with low SEP.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…If it is an age effect, our findings could indicate that material- and knowledge-related resources have a greater impact on subjective oral health in early and mid-adulthood than later in life. This stronger relationship between SEP and subjective oral health at younger ages could be explained by the “age-as-leveler” hypothesis that states that health inequalities widen in early to mid-adulthood and tend to decrease later in life [48]. One reason to explain this change is that people in higher SEP levels can only delay health decline for a specific period in their lives, and therefore, in later life they “catch up” those with low SEP.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Although the vast majority of studies have supported this hypothesis, it has long been contested on theoretical and empirical grounds. Doubts were raised particularly in studies that reported narrowing or persistent health gaps between education groups at older ages (Herd 2006; House et al 2005). More recent research has shown that patterns of narrowing health gaps emerged as artifacts in cross-sectional studies that could not disentangle age and cohort effects (Lynch 2003; Mirowsky and Ross 2008).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…While a couple of European studies confirm this inverse U-shape in the age profile of the health-income gradient (Van Ourti, 2003;Kamrul Islam et al, 2007), others show that it continues to prevail post retirement (Gerdtham and Johannesson, 2000;Burström et al, 2005), albeit less so for an occupation based measure of socioeconomic status (Marmot and Shipley, 1996), and even to increase in early old age (Chandola et al, 2007). This is relevant to an ongoing debate, to which we aim to contribute, over whether the relationship between health and socioeconomic status follows a process of cumulative advantage, with early life disparities in health becoming magnified over the life cycle (Ross and Wu, 1996;Lynch, 2003;Wilson et al, 2007;Kim and Durden, 2007), or whether health problems that inevitably arise in the course of time act as a leveller and so narrow socioeconomic disparities in old age (Kunst and Mackenbach 1994;Elo and Preston 1996;Deaton and Paxson 1998;Beckett 2000;Case and Deaton 2005;Herd 2006;Kim and Durden, 2007).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%