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Abstract: The present multimodal MRI study advances our understanding of the corticostriatal circuits underlying goal-directed vs. cue-driven, habitual food seeking. To this end, we employed a computerized Pavlovian-instrumental transfer paradigm. During the test phase, participants were free to perform learned instrumental responses (left and right key presses) for popcorn and Smarties outcomes. Importantly, prior to this test half of the participants had been sated on popcorn and the other half on Smartiesresulting in… Show more

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Cited by 41 publications
(39 citation statements)
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References 62 publications
(128 reference statements)
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“…The current findings are consistent with a growing number of recent studies demonstrating PIT effects in humans Sommer et al, 2017;Verhoeven et al, 2018;Vogel et al, 2018) and provide additional evidence for behavioral invigoration in the presence of a classically conditioned stimulus. The simplicity of the task allows for its use in fMRI studies, and possibly with a range of participants, including clinical populations, who may demonstrate limited tolerance for spending time in an MRI scanner (Corbit and Balleine, 2005;Martinovic et al, 2014;van Steenbergen et al, 2017). However, the task has some limitations as discussed above.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…A number of human PIT studies has been reported in recent years, reflecting growing interest in understanding the effects of classically conditioned cues on behavior. A little over half of these studies have examined appetitive conditioning, with many focusing on addictive behaviors, in relation to food (Pool et al, 2015;Quail et al, 2017a;Seabrooke et al, 2017;van Steenbergen et al, 2017), nicotine (Hogarth, 2012;Hogarth et al, 2015;Manglani et al, 2017) and alcohol (Martinovic et al, 2014;Garbusow et al, 2016;Hardy et al, 2017;Sommer et al, 2017). Some studies used targets of addiction (e.g., smells, pictures, taste) as cues or rewards, and others abstract cues and unrelated rewards (e.g., points, money), to study how the behavioral effects of conditioning vary.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
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“…A little more than half of the studies examined appetitive conditioning. Many of these studies have focused on examining addictive behavior, e.g., to food (Pool et al, 2015;Quail, Laurent and Balleine, 2017;Seabrooke et al, 2017;van Steenbergen et al, 2017), to nicotine (Hogarth, 2012;Hogarth, Maynard and Munafò, 2015;Manglani et al, 2017) and to alcohol (Martinovic et al, 2014;Garbusow et al, 2016;Hardy et al, 2017;Sommer et al, 2017a). Other studies have used PIT paradigms to evaluate how stress and depressed mood affect motivation (Huys et al, 2016;Quail, Laurent and Balleine, 2017), or to study the neural correlates of the transfer effects in non-disordered populations (Paredes-Olay et al, 2002;Talmi et al, 2008a;Allman et al, 2010;Geurts et al, 2013;Hebart and Gläscher, 2015;Sebold et al, 2016).…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%
“…In many human appetitive PIT studies, the transfer is examined through the effects of conditioned stimuli on goal-oriented behavior, most often response frequency or go/no-go response accuracy (Garbusow et al, 2014a;Sebold et al, 2016). Specific transfer effects are most frequently documented, i.e., the presence of a conditioned stimulus motivates only the behavior previously associated with the same reward, e.g., increased responding on a specific choice, (Manglani et al, 2017;van Steenbergen et al, 2017). General invigoration of behavior appear more difficult to demonstrate in humans.…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%