2002
DOI: 10.1001/archderm.138.1.112
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Diphencyprone for the Treatment of Alopecia Areata

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Cited by 51 publications
(49 citation statements)
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“…Use of skin irritants to treat AA have been recorded in literature since ancient times and AA has been treated with contact sensitizing agents for more than 30 years [163][164][165]. Today, diphenylcyclopropenone (DCP) or squaric acid dibutylester (SADBE) are widely used in countries outside of the USA for the treatment of more extensive AA presentations [7].…”
Section: Alopecia Areata Treatments and Treatment Development Currentmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Use of skin irritants to treat AA have been recorded in literature since ancient times and AA has been treated with contact sensitizing agents for more than 30 years [163][164][165]. Today, diphenylcyclopropenone (DCP) or squaric acid dibutylester (SADBE) are widely used in countries outside of the USA for the treatment of more extensive AA presentations [7].…”
Section: Alopecia Areata Treatments and Treatment Development Currentmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…This problem is aggravated by the fact that generally accepted, strictly evidence-based medicine guidelines for AA management remain to be developed (8,15). Immunotherapy with allergic contact sensitizers can be effective (16,17). These sensitizers (e.g., diphenylcyclopropenone) are applied weekly in a concentration sufficient to achieve low-grade chronic dermatitis.…”
Section: Clinical Featuresmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…4 Few treatments have been subjected to randomized controlled trials and, except for contact immunotherapy, there are few studies with long-term follow-up. [5][6][7][8][9][10][11] Most of the follow-up studies consider only severe degrees of AA and disregard milder disease, their treatment, and prognosis. 12 Familial history of autoimmune disease, personal history of atopy, severe hair loss, onset in childhood, and nail abnormalities have been associated with a poor prognosis.…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%