2008
DOI: 10.1186/1471-2148-8-94
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Abstract: BackgroundThere is spectacular morphological diversity in nature but lineages typically display a limited range of phenotypes. Because developmental processes generate the phenotypic variation that fuels natural selection, they are a likely source of evolutionary biases, facilitating some changes and limiting others. Although shifts in developmental regulation are associated with morphological differences between taxa, it is unclear how underlying mechanisms affect the rate and direction of evolutionary change… Show more

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Cited by 103 publications
(85 citation statements)
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References 106 publications
(138 reference statements)
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“…The idea that selection could directly act on evolvability is controversial [39], but in recent years computational models have shown that selection for evolvability is probably a generic property of all but the most simplistic genetic models ([40-45]; see also [46] for an empirical example). The present model, together with the demonstration of the existence of quasi-'neutral' rQTL variation [17,23,24], shows that selection may be able to modify the genetic architecture to increase evolvability and, specifically, increase the response rate to directional selection.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…For image acquisition, adult legs were dissected, and mounted on cover slips 22X22 mm No 1 (VWR), viewed with an Olympus BX41M and imaged with a Cool Snap camera U-CMAD (Photometrics) following protocols previously described (12,24). Angles were measured using the angle tool of Image J software (http://rsb.info.nih.gov/ij).…”
Section: Methodsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…For example, artificial selection in the butterfly, Bicyclus anynana, have shown that the size of eyespots and wings displays a rapid and pronounced response (10,11). In contrast, a developmental constraint has been inferred when selection fails to uncouple traits as in the failure to robustly uncouple changes in the diameter of the black and gold eyespot rings in B. anynana (8,12). Although comparative studies have proposed a compelling list of potential developmental constraints, there is little experimental evidence demonstrating mechanisms underlying their existence (5,6,9).…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Indeed, the variation involves little differences in pattern shape or number and instead consists in color composition differences. A difference in signal sensitivity rather than signal strength between the two forms is more likely to explain the phenomenon, resulting in a threshold trait variation (see Allen et al 2008 for a discussion of pattern size vs. color composition). We thus predict that this polymorphism could map to a Wnt-pathway gene or to a gene that can modify the output of the Wnt signaling pathway and that this gene should be active during the extracellular signaling phase or shortly thereafter.…”
Section: How When and Why Ligand Genes Are Likely Drivers Of Pattermentioning
confidence: 99%
“…1A) (21,22). One species, Bicyclus anynana, has become a model species amenable to laboratory rearing, and multiple aspects of its marginal eyespots (size, relative width of the color rings, shape) have been altered by artificial selection (23)(24)(25)(26)(27). However, change of color (hue), either pigmentary or structural, via artificial selection has not been reported.…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%