1992
DOI: 10.1055/s-2007-1020148 View full text |Buy / Rent full text
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Abstract: A 58-year-old woman with a mesothelial cyst of the diaphragm showed high level of serum Tissue Polypeptide Antigen (TPA) and cyst fluid TPA. Mesothelial cells of the cyst may excrete TPA and TPA was accumulated in the cysts. The measurement of tumor marker such as TPA of the serum or of the content of the cyst is useful in observation of the clinical course.

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“…Two case series described children (3.5-14 years) who presented with nonspecific abdominal complaints, 19,30 while another described patients who presented without any symptoms. 31 Ultrasound was the initial diagnostic study for children and this showed a thin-walled cystic structure. 19,30 The CT scan showed homogeneous, nonenhancing, well-defined cysts of water density, 19,30 while MRI showed a thin-walled cystic structure attached to the diaphragm.…”
Section: Benign Primary Tumor Diaphragm Cystsmentioning
“…30 Presentation of cyst in adults was even more uncommon than in children and was most often symptomatic, with patients complaining of chest pain, upper abdominal discomfort, and dyspnea. 26,[31][32][33] All of these patients underwent surgical resection of the cysts. Extrapolation of the literature would suggest that asymptomatic cysts could be managed conservatively and symptomatic cysts approached surgically or percutaneously.…”
Section: Benign Primary Tumor Diaphragm Cystsmentioning
“…Intrathoracic mesothelial cysts are recognized as being congenital defects thought to arise within the pleuro-peritoneal membrane during embryological development of the lung bud [1] , [2] and most commonly occur in the right or left anterior cardiophrenic angle although they may occur elsewhere [2] . An intradiaphragmatic location is exceptionally rare and there are only a few reports in the literature most of which are descriptions of 1 or 2 patients in whom surgical resection was performed because of concerns regarding the nature of the abnormality [1] , [3] , [4] , [5] , [6] . The majority of these reports conclude that imaging cannot safely exclude a malignant lesion and that resection is mandatory.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning