1984
DOI: 10.2466/pms.1984.59.2.623
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Abstract: The concept of deviational salience attempts to explain an aspect of the relationship between self-perception and perception in general. When individuals perceive themselves as deviating from the perceived norm of a salient environmental stimulus, that stimulus becomes even more meaningful. Verification involved the influence of self-perception of own stature by 314 high school boys aged 15 to 18 yr., who were asked to rate 12 occupations in terms of prestige and physical stature. Analysis indicated that subje… Show more

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Cited by 7 publications
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References 11 publications
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“…Turner and Broad bent, the election losers, were judged less tall after the election than before, but Mulroney, the elected Prime Minister, was rated taller after the election than before. These results are consistent with other studies demonstrating distortion of height judgements resulting from the target’s perceived status or prestige (e.g., Morrow, 1984; Ward, 1967). However, previous researchers have not examined the question of whether or not the tallness of the same target can change due to variations in his position or status.…”
supporting
confidence: 92%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…Turner and Broad bent, the election losers, were judged less tall after the election than before, but Mulroney, the elected Prime Minister, was rated taller after the election than before. These results are consistent with other studies demonstrating distortion of height judgements resulting from the target’s perceived status or prestige (e.g., Morrow, 1984; Ward, 1967). However, previous researchers have not examined the question of whether or not the tallness of the same target can change due to variations in his position or status.…”
supporting
confidence: 92%
“…Also, the judged size of people can be altered by psychological variables. For example, Dannenmaier & Thumin (1964) established that the authority of a person is a factor that affects how tall they are rated, and more recently, there are reports that the prestige of a man’s occupation may also be predictive of his judged height (Gillis, 1983; Hensley & Cooper, 1987; Lechelt, 1975; Morrow, 1984) 1 .…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%
“…6 No control of potential mediating variables within the sample, including timing of maturation, family size, birth order, ethnic and regional variations (see Vance et al 1994). 7 Use of subjective self-report measures (Morrow 1984). 8 Use of psychological concepts (e.g.…”
Section: Design Issues In Short Stature Research Studiesmentioning
confidence: 99%