2018
DOI: 10.1016/j.cemconres.2017.10.011
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Development of MgO concrete with enhanced hydration and carbonation mechanisms

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Cited by 124 publications
(67 citation statements)
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References 26 publications
(40 reference statements)
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“…Even though the hydration of MgO may result in the formation of a phase that exhibits higher volume than that of the initial constituents, replacing a part of the cement will directly decrease the amount of C-S-H that is capable of producing a more tortuous and less interconnected porous network [37], especially after carbonation of the specimen [62,64]. However, lower total pore volume and water absorption would likely be observed over time with ensuing carbonation reactions and formation of additional magnesium carbonate hydrates [30,37,65].…”
Section: Water Absorption By Capillarymentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Even though the hydration of MgO may result in the formation of a phase that exhibits higher volume than that of the initial constituents, replacing a part of the cement will directly decrease the amount of C-S-H that is capable of producing a more tortuous and less interconnected porous network [37], especially after carbonation of the specimen [62,64]. However, lower total pore volume and water absorption would likely be observed over time with ensuing carbonation reactions and formation of additional magnesium carbonate hydrates [30,37,65].…”
Section: Water Absorption By Capillarymentioning
confidence: 99%
“…of carbonated magnesia cement[344]. The needle-like nesquehonite and disk/rose-like hydromagnesite/dypingite, which are the main sources of strength development in these cement formulations, are observed.…”
mentioning
confidence: 93%
“…However, as the calcination temperature of MgO increased, the nesquehonite content gradually decreased, and in the 1000C25CC specimen, the nesquehonite content decreased to less than 40%. Though the formation conditions of nesquehonite are lowtemperature carbonation curing conditions (Hopkinson et al 2012), the reactivity decreased and carbonate formation reduced as the crystal size of the light-burned MgO increased, leading to more brucite production (Jin and Al-Tabbaa 2013;Unluer and Al-Tabbaa 2014a;Dung and Unluer 2018;Vágvölgyi et al 2008b).…”
Section: Crystal Phases Of Light-burned Mgo Paste Matrixmentioning
confidence: 99%