2019
DOI: 10.1186/s41687-019-0168-4
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Abstract: Background: Hypertension is the most prevalent risk factor for cardiovascular disease globally. Roughly one-third of the adult population has hypertension. However, most people diagnosed with hypertension do not benefit from blood pressure control with pharmacologic interventions: they are overdiagnosed and overtreated and might experience negative psychosocial consequences of being labelled. These consequences are relevant outcomes that need to be assessed and validly measured to identify all benefits and har… Show more

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Cited by 4 publications
(5 citation statements)
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References 39 publications
(42 reference statements)
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“…A previous qualitative assessment of the psychosocial consequences of labelling hypertension described the diagnosis of hypertension as a labelling event with potential unintended negative long-term psychosocial consequences (here assumed to be the same as negative effects of labelling) [ 11 ]. Similar results are confirmed by our research group in our study population [ 12 ].…”
Section: Introductionsupporting
confidence: 93%
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“…A previous qualitative assessment of the psychosocial consequences of labelling hypertension described the diagnosis of hypertension as a labelling event with potential unintended negative long-term psychosocial consequences (here assumed to be the same as negative effects of labelling) [ 11 ]. Similar results are confirmed by our research group in our study population [ 12 ].…”
Section: Introductionsupporting
confidence: 93%
“…The subscale ‘relations negative’ strengthens the social aspects of the psychosocial consequences of labelling, whereas the subscale ‘patient role’ strengthens the labelling effects, suggesting that the labelled people develop actions and attitudes expected from the labelled condition. These relevant aspects are found in the qualitative content analysis of our previous study [ 12 ].…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
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“…Initially, we did not plan to exclude publications applying qualitative research methods. However, we did not find a clear definition to differentiate between the active involvement of stakeholders and their involvement as participants in qualitative research, for example, in focus groups or interview studies 23–26. In some cases, both were reported in the same publication 23.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 90%
“…However, we did not find a clear definition to differentiate between the active involvement of stakeholders and their involvement as participants in qualitative research, for example in focus groups or interview studies. [e.g., [33][34][35] In some cases, both were reported in the same publication. [e.g., 33] This particular challenge has previously been noted in the context of assessing reporting of patient and public involvement.…”
Section: Strengths and Limitationsmentioning
confidence: 99%