2012
DOI: 10.1016/j.evolhumbehav.2011.07.002 View full text |Buy / Rent full text
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Abstract: The human face provides a wealth of information pertaining to the internal state and life-stage history of an individual. Facial width-to-height ratio is a size-independent sexually dimorphic trait, and estimates of aggression made by untrained adults judging own-race faces were positively associated with both facial width-to-height ratio and actual aggressive behavior. Given the significant adaptive value of accurately detecting aggressiveness based on facial appearance, we hypothesized that aggression estima… Show more

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“…While previous archival research has demonstrated associations between high fWHR and desirable outcomes such as greater reproductive success (Loehr & O'Hara, 2013;Valentine et al, 2014) or decreased death by physical violence , interpersonal evaluations of high fWHR males have been almost unanimously negative in valence (Carré et al, 2009;Hehman et al, 2013a;Short et al, 2012;Stirrat & Perrett, 2010). Thus, the social mechanisms underlying the perceived value and group-acceptance of high fWHR males, and driving positive outcomes associated with high fWHR, were unknown.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
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“…While previous archival research has demonstrated associations between high fWHR and desirable outcomes such as greater reproductive success (Loehr & O'Hara, 2013;Valentine et al, 2014) or decreased death by physical violence , interpersonal evaluations of high fWHR males have been almost unanimously negative in valence (Carré et al, 2009;Hehman et al, 2013a;Short et al, 2012;Stirrat & Perrett, 2010). Thus, the social mechanisms underlying the perceived value and group-acceptance of high fWHR males, and driving positive outcomes associated with high fWHR, were unknown.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
“…Given that higher fWHR corresponds with perceptions of aggression (Carré et al, 2009;Geniole et al, 2012;Short et al, 2012), intimidation (Hehman et al, 2013b), lesser intelligence, lesser friendliness, greater expression of prejudice (Hehman et al, 2013a), and untrustworthiness (Stirrat & Perrett, 2010), one possible explanation for individuals' demonstrated and robust sensitivity to fWHR is to facilitate avoidance of these individuals who are potentially dangerous both to one's physical person and to one's resources.…”
Section: Negative Associations With Fwhrmentioning
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“…One previous study used a comparable methodology to explore facial trustworthiness attributions in children with autism and noted exciting signs of trust inferences in their typical comparison group, who were aged as young as 6 years (Caulfield, Ewing, Burton, Avard, & Rhodes, 2014). Crucially this experiment did not compare outcomes between age groups or relate these judgments to those of adults Nevertheless, based on this result and other evidence that young children form inferences of competence (Antonakis & Dalgas, 2009), propensity towards aggression (Short et al, 2012) and likeability (Cogsdill et al, 2014) from faces, it seems likely that they also form clear impressions of trustworthiness in early childhood. Importantly however, the maturation of these judgments might be constrained by children's developing sensitivity to facial expressions.…”
Section: Trustworthiness Judgments Across Developmentmentioning
“…Notably, numerous studies also find that perceiver ratings of aggressiveness and dominance are highly correlated with the fWHR (e.g., 2010;Short et al, 2012;Geniole et al, 2014a; see Geniole et al, 2015, for meta-analysis), suggesting that the fWHR may serve as a reliable cue to one's propensity for aggressive behavior.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning